Responding to Supply Chain Disruptions: A Behavioural Approach

Student thesis: Doctoral ThesisPhD

Abstract

3) Study 3 applies attribution theory to investigate the link between disruption characteristics (severity and controllability), blame, and supply base redesign in the aftermath of a disruption. Using a vignette-based behavioural experiment, the study finds that severity does not have a significant effect on blame, whereas, controllability is positively related to people’s attribution of blame. Subsequently, the study applies a cross-sectional survey to examine the impact of blame on redesign decisions in real-life organisational settings. The findings show that attribution of blame only leads to redesign decisions when the level of trust in the supplier is low.
Date of Award15 May 2019
LanguageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • University of Bath
SupervisorBrian Squire (Supervisor) & Emma Brandon-Jones (Supervisor)

Cite this

Responding to Supply Chain Disruptions: A Behavioural Approach
Sarafan Chaharsoughi, M. (Author). 15 May 2019

Student thesis: Doctoral ThesisPhD