Women’s perceptions of how their dyslexia impacts on their mothering

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Abstract

Women with children have been depicted as struggling to justify themselves in the shadow of intensive mothering ideology. However, little is said about women who have a disability such as dyslexia, and how disability may intersect with intensive mothering ideology to present additional challenges. In this paper, life-story interviews are drawn upon to start to unpack the ways in which mothering and dyslexia may intersect. The themes discussed include: fear and perceived challenges of having a child with dyslexia; how mothers perceived their impairments manifest in their mothering, including poor organisational skills, short-term memory, reading and spelling; and how mothers may attempt to reframe the apparent contradiction between a ‘good’ mother and a mother with dyslexia by, for example, portraying themselves as a positive role-model for their child and better able to identify and cater for their child’s needs.
LanguageEnglish
Pages81-95
Number of pages15
JournalDisability & Society
Volume28
Issue number1
Early online date12 Jul 2012
DOIs
StatusPublished - Jan 2013

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Dyslexia
dyslexia
Mothers
ideology
disability
role model
Short-Term Memory
Fear
Reading
Interviews
anxiety
present
interview

Cite this

Women’s perceptions of how their dyslexia impacts on their mothering. / Skinner, Tina.

In: Disability & Society, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 81-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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