Windfalls, Wealth, and the Transition to Self-Employment

Yannis Georgellis, John G Sessions, Nikolaos Tsitsianis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine the transition to, and survival in, self-employment among a sample of British workers. We find evidence of capital constrains, with wealthier individuals being more likely to transit ceteris paribus. Windfall gains raise the probability of transition at a decreasing rate--gains of more than L20000-22000 reduce the probability of transition--and larger gains reduce the probability of transition amongst relatively wealthier respondents. We also find peculiarities in the effects of particular types of windfall; redundancy payments and inheritances raise the probability of transition, whilst lottery wins reduce the probability of (especially male) transitions. In contrast, inheritances (lottery wins) hinder (augment) self-employment survival.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)407-28
Number of pages22
JournalSmall Business Economics
Volume25
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Windfall
Wealth
Self-employment
Lottery
Payment
Ceteris paribus
Redundancy
Workers

Keywords

  • Non-labor Discrimination (J160)
  • Labor Demand (J230)
  • Economics of Gender
  • Startups (M130)
  • New Firms

Cite this

Georgellis, Y., Sessions, J. G., & Tsitsianis, N. (2005). Windfalls, Wealth, and the Transition to Self-Employment. Small Business Economics, 25(5), 407-28.

Windfalls, Wealth, and the Transition to Self-Employment. / Georgellis, Yannis; Sessions, John G; Tsitsianis, Nikolaos.

In: Small Business Economics, Vol. 25, No. 5, 2005, p. 407-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Georgellis, Y, Sessions, JG & Tsitsianis, N 2005, 'Windfalls, Wealth, and the Transition to Self-Employment', Small Business Economics, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 407-28.
Georgellis Y, Sessions JG, Tsitsianis N. Windfalls, Wealth, and the Transition to Self-Employment. Small Business Economics. 2005;25(5):407-28.
Georgellis, Yannis ; Sessions, John G ; Tsitsianis, Nikolaos. / Windfalls, Wealth, and the Transition to Self-Employment. In: Small Business Economics. 2005 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 407-28.
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