Why Do We Think That People who are Visually Impaired Don’t Want to Know About the Visual Arts II?

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Many influential contemporary studies focus on the perception of objects and “real things,” such as perception and visual imagery. They do not examine: - the nature of cultural practice - the motivation for creative and imaginative activity - why art is important to people who are blind This presentation examines two people with visual impairment and their teacher at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and their experiences of viewing paintings. Hayhoe, S. (2017) Blind Visitor Experiences at Art Museums. New York: Rowman & Littlefield.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 10 Nov 2020
EventCreative Sandpit @ the (virtual) American Museum - American Museum / Virtual, Bath, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 9 Nov 202010 Nov 2020
Conference number: 1

Workshop

WorkshopCreative Sandpit @ the (virtual) American Museum
Abbreviated titleCreative Sandpit
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityBath
Period9/11/2010/11/20

Keywords

  • visual impairment
  • museums
  • art
  • fine art
  • inclusion
  • access
  • blind
  • blindness

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