Why are criminals less educated than non-criminals? Evidence from a cohort of young Australian twins

Dinand Webbink, Pierre Koning, Sunčica Vujić, Nicholas G. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many studies find a strong negative association between crime and education. This raises the question whether crime reduces investment in human capital or whether education reduces criminal activity. This article investigates posed question by using fixed-effect estimation on data of Australian twins. We find early arrests (before the age of 18) both to have a strong effect on human capital accumulation, as well as strong detrimental effects on adult crime. Schooling does not have an effect on adult crime if there is variation in early arrests. However, schooling reduces crime if there is little variation in early crime. (JEL code: I2, K42).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-144
Number of pages30
JournalThe Journal of Law, Economics and Organization
Volume29
Issue number1
Early online date23 Apr 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

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