Where now for fair trade?

Bob Doherty, Iain A. Davies, Sophi Tranchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)
89 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper critically examines the discourse surrounding fair trade mainstreaming, and discusses the potential avenues for the future of the social movement. The authors have a unique insight into the fair trade market having a combined experience of over 30 years in practice and 15 as fair trade scholars. The paper highlights a number of benefits of mainstreaming, not least the continued growth of the global fair trade market (tipped to top $7bn in 2012). However, the paper also highlights the negative consequences of mainstreaming on the long-term viability of fair trade as a credible ethical standard.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-189
Number of pages29
JournalBusiness History
Volume55
Issue number2
Early online date14 Aug 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Fair trade
Fair Trade
Social movements
Viability
Discourse
Ethical standards
Social Movements
Ethical Standards

Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • fair trade
  • mainstreaming
  • fair trade organisations
  • supermarket retailers
  • multinational corporations
  • co-optation
  • dilution
  • fair-washing

Cite this

Where now for fair trade? / Doherty, Bob; Davies, Iain A.; Tranchell, Sophi.

In: Business History, Vol. 55, No. 2, 2013, p. 161-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doherty, B, Davies, IA & Tranchell, S 2013, 'Where now for fair trade?', Business History, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 161-189. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2012.692083
Doherty, Bob ; Davies, Iain A. ; Tranchell, Sophi. / Where now for fair trade?. In: Business History. 2013 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 161-189.
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