What influences business academics’ use of the Association of Business Schools’ (ABS) list? Evidence from a survey of UK academics

James Walker, Evelyn Fenton, Ammon Salter, Rossella Salandra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of the Association of Business Schools’ (ABS) list in 2007 and its rapid adoption by UK business schools has had a profound effect on the nature of business and management academics’ ways of working. Using a large-scale survey of UK business academics, we assess the extent to which individuals use the Academic Journal Guide (AJG/ABS) list in their day-to-day professional activities. In particular, we explore how their perceptions of the list, the academic influence of their research, academic rank and organizational context drive the varied use. Building on prior research on the importance of univalent attitudes in predicting behaviour, we find those who have either strong positive or negative views of the list are more extensive users than those who are ambivalent. We also find that the extent of use of the AJG/ABS list is greatest among those academics who have lower academic influence, in the middle or junior ranks within Business Schools and in middle and low-status universities. We explore the implications of these findings for the value of journal rankings and for the management of business schools.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)730-747
Number of pages18
JournalBritish Journal of Management
Volume30
Issue number3
Early online date1 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

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Industry
Business schools
Journal ranking
Academic research
Academic journals
Organizational context

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

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