What are the recovery and attrition outcomes for group CBT and individual CBT for Generalised Anxiety Disorder in an IAPT Service? An exploratory study

Marianne Fanous, Jo Daniels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Group cognitive behavioural therapy (gCBT) is commonly used in Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. However, there is limited knowledge of the efficacy of gCBT as a delivery format for generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). To address gaps in literature, this study aims to explore the efficacy and attrition of individual and group CBT interventions, respectively, at Step 3 for GAD using data from a routine IAPT service over a 24-month period. Data were retrospectively derived from a routine service's IAPTus database, separating those eligible for comparison into group (n = 44) and individual (n = 55) CBT for GAD. Outcomes were differences in pre-post self-reported anxiety (GAD-7) and depression (PHQ-9) scores, clinical recovery and attrition for gCBT and individual CBT. Both gCBT and individual CBT yielded significant reductions in self-reported anxiety and depression scores over time. Results indicate that 53% of patients attending individual CBT achieved clinical recovery, with similar but less competitive rates of 41% in gCBT. Attrition rates were similar between gCBT (29.5%) and individual CBT (27.3%), respectively. Preliminary results suggest that both individual and gCBT are effective interventions for GAD patients in IAPT, offering symptom alleviation and comparable recovery and attrition rates post-intervention. This observational design offers credibility and insight into a pragmatic evaluative and explorative comparison. gCBT may offer an acceptable and potentially economical alternative.Key learning aims(1)To explore whether gCBT and individual CBT yield significant symptom reduction in self-reported anxiety and depression in GAD patients from a routine IAPT service.(2)To explore gCBT and individual CBT clinical recovery rates in non-optimum routine conditions.(3)To explore whether gCBT for GAD produces unacceptable attrition rates and if this differs from attrition rates in individual CBT for GAD in a routine IAPT service.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere15
JournalThe Cognitive Behaviour Therapist
Volume13
Early online date9 Jun 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • CBT
  • GAD
  • IAPT
  • group cognitive behavioural therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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