Well-being as a function of person-country fit in human values

Paul Hanel, Uwe Wolfradt, Lukas Wolf, Gabriel Lins De Holanda Coelho, Gregory Maio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

It is often assumed that incongruence between individuals’ values and those of their country is distressing, but the evidence has been mixed. Across 29 countries, the present research investigated whether well-being is higher if people’s values match with those of people living in the same country or region. Using representative samples, we find that person-country and person-region value congruence predict six well-being measures (e.g., emotional well-being, relationship support; N = 54,673). Crucially, however, value type moderates whether person-country fit is positively or negatively associated with well-being. People who value self-direction, stimulation, and hedonism more and live in countries and regions where people on average share these values report lower well-being. In contrast, people who value achievement, power, and security more and live in countries and regions where people on average share these values, report higher well-being. Additionally, we find that people who moderately value stimulation report the highest well-being.
Original languageEnglish
Article number5150
JournalNature Communications
Volume11
Issue number1
Early online date13 Oct 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Oct 2020

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