• 30 Citations

Abstract

The provision of safe water and adequate sanitation to developing countries is a must. A range of chemical and biological methods are currently used to ensure the safety of water for consumption. These methods however suffer from high costs, complexity of use and inability to function onsite and in real time. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has great potential for the rapid and simple testing of the quality of water sources. MFCs have the advantages of high simplicity and possibility for onsite and real time monitoring. Depending on the choice of the manufacturing materials, this technology can also be highly cost effective. This review covers the state-of-the-art research on MFC sensors for water quality monitoring, and explores enabling factors for their use in developing countries.
LanguageEnglish
Pages450-470
Number of pages21
JournalBiosensors
Volume5
Issue number3
Early online date16 Jul 2015
DOIs
StatusPublished - Sep 2015

Fingerprint

Bioelectric Energy Sources
Microbial fuel cells
Water Quality
Developing countries
Developing Countries
Water quality
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Sanitation
Water
Monitoring
Causality
Drinking
Safety
Costs
Research
Sensors
Testing

Cite this

Water quality monitoring in developing countries; can microbial fuel cells be the answer? / Chouler, Jon; Di Lorenzo, Mirella.

In: Biosensors, Vol. 5, No. 3, 09.2015, p. 450-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f8004aa713114729acb0411f4ee0a65e,
title = "Water quality monitoring in developing countries; can microbial fuel cells be the answer?",
abstract = "The provision of safe water and adequate sanitation to developing countries is a must. A range of chemical and biological methods are currently used to ensure the safety of water for consumption. These methods however suffer from high costs, complexity of use and inability to function onsite and in real time. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has great potential for the rapid and simple testing of the quality of water sources. MFCs have the advantages of high simplicity and possibility for onsite and real time monitoring. Depending on the choice of the manufacturing materials, this technology can also be highly cost effective. This review covers the state-of-the-art research on MFC sensors for water quality monitoring, and explores enabling factors for their use in developing countries.",
author = "Jon Chouler and {Di Lorenzo}, Mirella",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
doi = "10.3390/bios5030450",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "450--470",
journal = "Biosensors",
issn = "2079-6374",
publisher = "MDPI",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Water quality monitoring in developing countries; can microbial fuel cells be the answer?

AU - Chouler, Jon

AU - Di Lorenzo, Mirella

PY - 2015/9

Y1 - 2015/9

N2 - The provision of safe water and adequate sanitation to developing countries is a must. A range of chemical and biological methods are currently used to ensure the safety of water for consumption. These methods however suffer from high costs, complexity of use and inability to function onsite and in real time. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has great potential for the rapid and simple testing of the quality of water sources. MFCs have the advantages of high simplicity and possibility for onsite and real time monitoring. Depending on the choice of the manufacturing materials, this technology can also be highly cost effective. This review covers the state-of-the-art research on MFC sensors for water quality monitoring, and explores enabling factors for their use in developing countries.

AB - The provision of safe water and adequate sanitation to developing countries is a must. A range of chemical and biological methods are currently used to ensure the safety of water for consumption. These methods however suffer from high costs, complexity of use and inability to function onsite and in real time. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has great potential for the rapid and simple testing of the quality of water sources. MFCs have the advantages of high simplicity and possibility for onsite and real time monitoring. Depending on the choice of the manufacturing materials, this technology can also be highly cost effective. This review covers the state-of-the-art research on MFC sensors for water quality monitoring, and explores enabling factors for their use in developing countries.

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/bios5030450

U2 - 10.3390/bios5030450

DO - 10.3390/bios5030450

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 450

EP - 470

JO - Biosensors

T2 - Biosensors

JF - Biosensors

SN - 2079-6374

IS - 3

ER -