Visual experience facilitates allocentric spatial representation

Achille Pasqualotto, Mary Jane Spiller, Ashok S. Jansari, Michael J. Proulx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 32 Citations

Abstract

Representing the position of the objects independently from our own position is a fundamental cognitive ability. Here we investigated whether this ability depends on visual experience. Congenitally blind, late blind and blindfolded sighted participants haptically learnt a room-sized regularly shaped array of objects, and their spatial memory was tested to determine which spatial reference frame was used. Crucially, the use of an object-based reference frame requires representing the regular structure of the array. We found that blindfolded sighted and late blind participants, that is those with visual experience, showed a preferential use of the object-based or 'allocentric' reference frame. On the contrary, congenitally blind participants preferred a self-based, or egocentric, reference frame. This suggests that, due to its developmental effect on the multisensory brain areas involved in spatial cognition, visual experience is necessary to develop a preference for an object-based, allocentric reference frame.
LanguageEnglish
Pages175-179
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume236
DOIs
StatusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Aptitude
Cognition
Brain
Spatial Memory

Cite this

Visual experience facilitates allocentric spatial representation. / Pasqualotto, Achille; Spiller, Mary Jane; Jansari, Ashok S.; Proulx, Michael J.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 236, 01.2013, p. 175-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pasqualotto A, Spiller MJ, Jansari AS, Proulx MJ. Visual experience facilitates allocentric spatial representation. Behavioural Brain Research. 2013 Jan;236:175-179. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2012.08.042
Pasqualotto, Achille ; Spiller, Mary Jane ; Jansari, Ashok S. ; Proulx, Michael J./ Visual experience facilitates allocentric spatial representation. In: Behavioural Brain Research. 2013 ; Vol. 236. pp. 175-179
@article{2a328732a47c48608fd2d90d54f004f7,
title = "Visual experience facilitates allocentric spatial representation",
abstract = "Representing the position of the objects independently from our own position is a fundamental cognitive ability. Here we investigated whether this ability depends on visual experience. Congenitally blind, late blind and blindfolded sighted participants haptically learnt a room-sized regularly shaped array of objects, and their spatial memory was tested to determine which spatial reference frame was used. Crucially, the use of an object-based reference frame requires representing the regular structure of the array. We found that blindfolded sighted and late blind participants, that is those with visual experience, showed a preferential use of the object-based or 'allocentric' reference frame. On the contrary, congenitally blind participants preferred a self-based, or egocentric, reference frame. This suggests that, due to its developmental effect on the multisensory brain areas involved in spatial cognition, visual experience is necessary to develop a preference for an object-based, allocentric reference frame.",
author = "Achille Pasqualotto and Spiller, {Mary Jane} and Jansari, {Ashok S.} and Proulx, {Michael J.}",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbr.2012.08.042",
language = "English",
volume = "236",
pages = "175--179",
journal = "Behavioural Brain Research",
issn = "0166-4328",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Visual experience facilitates allocentric spatial representation

AU - Pasqualotto,Achille

AU - Spiller,Mary Jane

AU - Jansari,Ashok S.

AU - Proulx,Michael J.

PY - 2013/1

Y1 - 2013/1

N2 - Representing the position of the objects independently from our own position is a fundamental cognitive ability. Here we investigated whether this ability depends on visual experience. Congenitally blind, late blind and blindfolded sighted participants haptically learnt a room-sized regularly shaped array of objects, and their spatial memory was tested to determine which spatial reference frame was used. Crucially, the use of an object-based reference frame requires representing the regular structure of the array. We found that blindfolded sighted and late blind participants, that is those with visual experience, showed a preferential use of the object-based or 'allocentric' reference frame. On the contrary, congenitally blind participants preferred a self-based, or egocentric, reference frame. This suggests that, due to its developmental effect on the multisensory brain areas involved in spatial cognition, visual experience is necessary to develop a preference for an object-based, allocentric reference frame.

AB - Representing the position of the objects independently from our own position is a fundamental cognitive ability. Here we investigated whether this ability depends on visual experience. Congenitally blind, late blind and blindfolded sighted participants haptically learnt a room-sized regularly shaped array of objects, and their spatial memory was tested to determine which spatial reference frame was used. Crucially, the use of an object-based reference frame requires representing the regular structure of the array. We found that blindfolded sighted and late blind participants, that is those with visual experience, showed a preferential use of the object-based or 'allocentric' reference frame. On the contrary, congenitally blind participants preferred a self-based, or egocentric, reference frame. This suggests that, due to its developmental effect on the multisensory brain areas involved in spatial cognition, visual experience is necessary to develop a preference for an object-based, allocentric reference frame.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84866290830&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2012.08.042

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbr.2012.08.042

DO - 10.1016/j.bbr.2012.08.042

M3 - Article

VL - 236

SP - 175

EP - 179

JO - Behavioural Brain Research

T2 - Behavioural Brain Research

JF - Behavioural Brain Research

SN - 0166-4328

ER -