Valuing e-inclusion

Social media and the social networks of adolescents with intellectual disability

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract


Background:

Social media is a growing phenomenon, yet people with intellectual disability (ID) may not experience comparable access to this communication technology. Adolescents with ID may benefit from e-inclusion, especially as individuals with ID are at risk of having smaller social networks.
Materials and Methods:
The Social Network Guide was adapted to measure social media usage and used to examine the interpersonal relationships of adolescents with and without ID.

Results:
Adolescents with ID held smaller social networks with less developed informal relationships. However, friendship quality was comparable or superior to typically developing peers. Adolescents with ID interacted with a smaller percentage of contacts using social media. Social media use was predictive of the number of reported friendships and did not significantly predict critical comments.

Conclusions:
Findings suggest that adolescents with ID have comparable access to social media but use these sites to interact with a smaller number of social contacts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disabilities
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2019

Cite this

@article{da0b68842c8d453a8bb36173ee9c0250,
title = "Valuing e-inclusion: Social media and the social networks of adolescents with intellectual disability",
abstract = "Background:Social media is a growing phenomenon, yet people with intellectual disability (ID) may not experience comparable access to this communication technology. Adolescents with ID may benefit from e-inclusion, especially as individuals with ID are at risk of having smaller social networks.Materials and Methods:The Social Network Guide was adapted to measure social media usage and used to examine the interpersonal relationships of adolescents with and without ID.Results:Adolescents with ID held smaller social networks with less developed informal relationships. However, friendship quality was comparable or superior to typically developing peers. Adolescents with ID interacted with a smaller percentage of contacts using social media. Social media use was predictive of the number of reported friendships and did not significantly predict critical comments.Conclusions:Findings suggest that adolescents with ID have comparable access to social media but use these sites to interact with a smaller number of social contacts.",
author = "Pippa White and Rachel Forrester-Jones",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1177/1744629518821240",
language = "English",
pages = "1--17",
journal = "Journal of Intellectual Disabilities",
issn = "1744-6295",
publisher = "Sage Publications",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Valuing e-inclusion

T2 - Social media and the social networks of adolescents with intellectual disability

AU - White, Pippa

AU - Forrester-Jones, Rachel

PY - 2019/1/7

Y1 - 2019/1/7

N2 - Background:Social media is a growing phenomenon, yet people with intellectual disability (ID) may not experience comparable access to this communication technology. Adolescents with ID may benefit from e-inclusion, especially as individuals with ID are at risk of having smaller social networks.Materials and Methods:The Social Network Guide was adapted to measure social media usage and used to examine the interpersonal relationships of adolescents with and without ID.Results:Adolescents with ID held smaller social networks with less developed informal relationships. However, friendship quality was comparable or superior to typically developing peers. Adolescents with ID interacted with a smaller percentage of contacts using social media. Social media use was predictive of the number of reported friendships and did not significantly predict critical comments.Conclusions:Findings suggest that adolescents with ID have comparable access to social media but use these sites to interact with a smaller number of social contacts.

AB - Background:Social media is a growing phenomenon, yet people with intellectual disability (ID) may not experience comparable access to this communication technology. Adolescents with ID may benefit from e-inclusion, especially as individuals with ID are at risk of having smaller social networks.Materials and Methods:The Social Network Guide was adapted to measure social media usage and used to examine the interpersonal relationships of adolescents with and without ID.Results:Adolescents with ID held smaller social networks with less developed informal relationships. However, friendship quality was comparable or superior to typically developing peers. Adolescents with ID interacted with a smaller percentage of contacts using social media. Social media use was predictive of the number of reported friendships and did not significantly predict critical comments.Conclusions:Findings suggest that adolescents with ID have comparable access to social media but use these sites to interact with a smaller number of social contacts.

U2 - 10.1177/1744629518821240

DO - 10.1177/1744629518821240

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 17

JO - Journal of Intellectual Disabilities

JF - Journal of Intellectual Disabilities

SN - 1744-6295

ER -