Using coordinate transformation of Navier–Stokes equations to solve flow in multiple helical geometries

Andrew Cookson, D.j. Doorly, S.j. Sherwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Recent research on small amplitude helical pipes for use as bypass grafts and arterio-venous shunts, suggests that mixing may help prevent occlusion by thrombosis. It is proposed here that joining together two helical geometries, of different helical radii, will enhance mixing, with only a small increase in pressure loss. To determine the velocity field, a coordinate transformation of the Navier–Stokes equations is used, which is then solved using a 2-D high-order mesh combined with a Fourier decomposition in the periodic direction. The results show that the velocity fields in each component geometry differ strongly from the corresponding solution for a single helical geometry. The results suggest that, although the mixing behaviour will be weaker than an idealised prediction indicates, it will be improved from that generated in a single helical geometry.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2069-2079
JournalJournal of Computational and Applied Mathematics
Volume234
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2010

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