Using affective judgement to increase physical activity in British adults

Alice S. Forster, Penny Buykx, Neil Martin, Susannah Sadler, Ben Southgate, Lauren Rockcliffe, Ian Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mobile phone apps have been shown to increase physical activity (PA), but existing apps fail to target the emotional aspects of PA, which influence whether individuals are active. We developed an app that encourages individuals to focus on the emotional aspects of PA. We aimed to assess the acceptability of this app, and conduct a preliminary evaluation of efficacy. The app was developed in collaboration with users through focus groups. Seven users tested the app over 4 months and provided feedback on acceptability, aesthetics and functionality in a follow-up focus group. Results were summarized descriptively. Before testing the app, participants completed a questionnaire assessing their current PA and psychological antecedents of PA. A second questionnaire was completed at the follow-up focus group. Change scores are reported for each participant and overall.

The social and reminder aspects facilitated motivation to be active and many found it easy to integrate into their lives. Most suggested modifications. Small improvements in number of minutes spent walking per week were observed (overall mean change +25 min) and some psychological antecedents of PA (overall mean change for social support for PA +0.14, self-efficacy for PA +0.17, outcome expectations about PA +0.20; all five-point scales), but reductions were seen in other domains. The app was acceptable to users, although developments are required. Testing with a small number of individuals, offering preliminary evidence of efficacy of this app, provides justification for further evaluation on a larger scale.
LanguageEnglish
Article numberdax004
Pages648-656
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Promotion International
Volume33
Issue number4
Early online date27 Feb 2017
DOIs
StatusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

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Exercise
Focus Groups
Mobile Applications
Psychology
Cell Phones
questionnaire
Group
Self Efficacy
evaluation
Esthetics
Social Support
functionality
Walking
self-efficacy
social support
Motivation
aesthetics
evidence

Cite this

Forster, A. S., Buykx, P., Martin, N., Sadler, S., Southgate, B., Rockcliffe, L., & Walker, I. (2018). Using affective judgement to increase physical activity in British adults. Health Promotion International, 33(4), 648-656. [dax004]. https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dax004

Using affective judgement to increase physical activity in British adults. / Forster, Alice S.; Buykx, Penny; Martin, Neil; Sadler, Susannah; Southgate, Ben; Rockcliffe, Lauren; Walker, Ian.

In: Health Promotion International, Vol. 33, No. 4, dax004, 01.08.2018, p. 648-656.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Forster, AS, Buykx, P, Martin, N, Sadler, S, Southgate, B, Rockcliffe, L & Walker, I 2018, 'Using affective judgement to increase physical activity in British adults', Health Promotion International, vol. 33, no. 4, dax004, pp. 648-656. https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dax004
Forster AS, Buykx P, Martin N, Sadler S, Southgate B, Rockcliffe L et al. Using affective judgement to increase physical activity in British adults. Health Promotion International. 2018 Aug 1;33(4):648-656. dax004. https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dax004
Forster, Alice S. ; Buykx, Penny ; Martin, Neil ; Sadler, Susannah ; Southgate, Ben ; Rockcliffe, Lauren ; Walker, Ian. / Using affective judgement to increase physical activity in British adults. In: Health Promotion International. 2018 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 648-656.
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