Use of the linear driving force approximation to guide the design of monolithic adsorbents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to provide the basic tools necessary to guide the optimal design of monolithic adsorbents. Previous work has concd. on optimizing monolith manufg. processes and exptl. studies have suggested that the mass transfer performance of the monolithic form might be inferior to that of the more traditional packed bed form. In this paper, the classical linear driving force approxn., along with the parabolic concn. gradient assumption, is applied to a no. of simple geometries. Transformation of square, rectangular, triangular and hexagonal geometries to an equiv. hollow cylinder on the basis of equal vol. and equal internal surface area, facilitates use of the linear driving force anal. soln. for a cylinder in order to guide the design of the more complex monolith geometries. Taking channel mass transfer performance and pressure gradients into consideration as well, the analyses indicate that regular hexagonal channels offer the best compromise on overall performance, with minimization of the wall thickness being the key design objective. Use of the algebraic design equations for the circular channel provides an excellent approxn. for the regular hexagon and thus design work can be carried out with the former and simpler geometry. The engineering challenge now becomes one of manufg. monoliths with appropriately thin walls. A challenge for the future is to obtain the full numerical solns. for the square, rectangular, triangular and hexagonal geometries. [on SciFinder (R)]
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)999-1009
Number of pages11
JournalChemical Engineering Research & Design
Volume82
Issue numberA8
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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Adsorbents
Geometry
Mass transfer
Packed beds
Pressure gradient

Keywords

  • Chemical engineering design
  • Waste gases (use of the linear driving force approxn. to guide the design of monolithic adsorbents)
  • Adsorption
  • Adsorbents
  • Exhaust gases
  • linear driving force approxn design monolithic adsorbent circular channel

Cite this

Use of the linear driving force approximation to guide the design of monolithic adsorbents. / Patton, A; Crittenden, B D; Perera, S P.

In: Chemical Engineering Research & Design, Vol. 82, No. A8, 2004, p. 999-1009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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