Unpacking intuition

a process and outcome framework.

Julie Gore, Eugene Sadler-smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, the topic of intuition has become an important focus of attention in psychology. It is often assumed to be a unitary construct; however, recent research suggests that intuition is multifaceted. This article disaggregates intuition by discriminating between domain-general mechanisms and domain-specific processes of intuiting and primary types of intuition and secondary types of intuition. The theoretical relationships between and within processes and types are examined and analyzed at behavioral and information processing levels, noting the importance in advances in social cognition research. As a result of this analysis, we provide a conceptual framework that connects intuitive processes and outcomes. The article concludes by outlining some of the implications of the framework and in particular highlights future methodological challenges faced by intuition researchers in laboratory and organizational field settings
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-316
JournalReview of General Psychology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

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Cite this

Unpacking intuition : a process and outcome framework. / Gore, Julie; Sadler-smith, Eugene.

In: Review of General Psychology, Vol. 15, No. 4, 12.2011, p. 304-316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gore, Julie ; Sadler-smith, Eugene. / Unpacking intuition : a process and outcome framework. In: Review of General Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 304-316.
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