Universal simplicity? The alleged simplicity of Universal Credit from administrative and claimant perspectives

Kate Summers, David Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A key aim of Universal Credit is to simplify the social security system. While several aspects of its introduction have received critical attention, this overarching aim continues to receive acceptance and support. Drawing on two empirical studies involving means-tested benefit claimants, we aim to deconstruct the idea of ‘simplicity’ as a feature of social security design and argue that it is contingent on perspective. We suggest that claims of simplicity can often be justified from an administrative perspective but are not experienced as such from the perspective of claimants, who instead can face greater responsibility for managing complexity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-186
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Poverty and Social Justice
Volume28
Issue number2
Early online date10 Feb 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2020

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