Ultrastructural and molecular analyzes of insulin-producing cells induced from human hepatoma cells

M Peran, A Sanchez-Ferrero, David Tosh, J A Marchal, E Lopez, P Alvarez, H Boulaiz, F Rodriguez-Serrano, A Aranega

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background aims. Diabetes type I is an autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing (beta-) cells and resulting in external insulin dependence for life. Islet transplantation represents a potential treatment for diabetes but there is currently a shortage of suitable organs donors. To augment the supply of donors, different strategies are required to provide a potential source of beta-cells. These sources include embryonic and adult stem cells as well as differentiated cell types. The main goal of this study was to induce the transdifferentiation (or conversion of one type cell to another) of human hepatoma cells (HepG2 cells) to insulin-expressing cells based on the exposure of HepG2 cells to an extract of rat insulinoma cells (R1N).

Methods. HepG2 cells were first transiently permeabilized with Streptolysin O and then exposed to a cell extract obtained from RIN cells. Following transient exposure to the RIN extract, the HepG2 cells were cultured for 3 weeks. Results. Acquisition of the insulin-producing cell phenotype was determined on the basis of (i) morphologic and (ii) ultrastructural observations, (iii) immunologic detection and (iv) reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis.

Conclusions. This study supports the use of cell extract as a feasible method for achieve transdifferentiation of hepatic cells to insulin-producing cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-200
Number of pages8
JournalCytotherapy
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

Fingerprint

Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Insulin
Hep G2 Cells
Cell Extracts
Tissue Donors
Islets of Langerhans Transplantation
Insulinoma
Adult Stem Cells
Embryonic Stem Cells
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Autoimmune Diseases
Reverse Transcription
Hepatocytes
Phenotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • diabetes
  • transdifferentiation
  • beta-cells
  • insulin-producing cells

Cite this

Peran, M., Sanchez-Ferrero, A., Tosh, D., Marchal, J. A., Lopez, E., Alvarez, P., ... Aranega, A. (2011). Ultrastructural and molecular analyzes of insulin-producing cells induced from human hepatoma cells. Cytotherapy, 13(2), 193-200. https://doi.org/10.3109/14653249.2010.501791

Ultrastructural and molecular analyzes of insulin-producing cells induced from human hepatoma cells. / Peran, M; Sanchez-Ferrero, A; Tosh, David; Marchal, J A; Lopez, E; Alvarez, P; Boulaiz, H; Rodriguez-Serrano, F; Aranega, A.

In: Cytotherapy, Vol. 13, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 193-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peran, M, Sanchez-Ferrero, A, Tosh, D, Marchal, JA, Lopez, E, Alvarez, P, Boulaiz, H, Rodriguez-Serrano, F & Aranega, A 2011, 'Ultrastructural and molecular analyzes of insulin-producing cells induced from human hepatoma cells', Cytotherapy, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 193-200. https://doi.org/10.3109/14653249.2010.501791
Peran, M ; Sanchez-Ferrero, A ; Tosh, David ; Marchal, J A ; Lopez, E ; Alvarez, P ; Boulaiz, H ; Rodriguez-Serrano, F ; Aranega, A. / Ultrastructural and molecular analyzes of insulin-producing cells induced from human hepatoma cells. In: Cytotherapy. 2011 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 193-200.
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