Two studies investigating gender differences in response to facebook status updates

Richard Joiner, Lina Dapkeviciute, Helen Johnson, Jeffrey Gavin, Mark Brosnan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We conducted two studies to examine gender differences in in response to Facebook status updates. The first study surveyed600 undergraduate students (388 females and 207males), and analysed males' and females' responses to Facebook status updates. Females were significantly more likely to post a public reply than males, and female public replies also contained higher levels of emotional support. There were no significant gender differences in private replies to Facebook status updates. Males showed significantly higher levels of emotional support in private messages than in public replies. There was no significant difference in terms of level of emotional support between females' public replies and private messages. The second study investigated gender differences in response to Facebook status updates from same gender friends compared to opposite gender friends. We surveyed 522 undergraduate students (216 females and 306 males), and analysed males' and females' responses to two Facebook status updates: one from a same gender close friend and one from an opposite gender close friend. Females showed higher levels of emotional support than males to a Facebook status update from a same gender friend. In contrast, there were no significant gender differences in response to an opposite gender friend. Males showed higher levels of emotional support in private replies than public replies to same gender friends. There was no difference in level of emotional support between females' public replies and private messages. The implications of these findings for explanations of gender differences in language use are discussed.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 9th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM), 2015
EditorsD. Quercia, B. Hogan
PublisherAAAI Press
Pages622-625
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781577357339
StatusPublished - Jul 2015
Event9th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2015 - Oxford, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 26 May 201529 May 2015

Conference

Conference9th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2015
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityOxford
Period26/05/1529/05/15

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facebook
gender-specific factors
gender
female student
language

Cite this

Joiner, R., Dapkeviciute, L., Johnson, H., Gavin, J., & Brosnan, M. (2015). Two studies investigating gender differences in response to facebook status updates. In D. Quercia, & B. Hogan (Eds.), Proceedings of the 9th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM), 2015 (pp. 622-625). AAAI Press.

Two studies investigating gender differences in response to facebook status updates. / Joiner, Richard; Dapkeviciute, Lina; Johnson, Helen; Gavin, Jeffrey; Brosnan, Mark.

Proceedings of the 9th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM), 2015. ed. / D. Quercia; B. Hogan. AAAI Press, 2015. p. 622-625.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Joiner, R, Dapkeviciute, L, Johnson, H, Gavin, J & Brosnan, M 2015, Two studies investigating gender differences in response to facebook status updates. in D Quercia & B Hogan (eds), Proceedings of the 9th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM), 2015. AAAI Press, pp. 622-625, 9th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2015, Oxford, UK United Kingdom, 26/05/15.
Joiner R, Dapkeviciute L, Johnson H, Gavin J, Brosnan M. Two studies investigating gender differences in response to facebook status updates. In Quercia D, Hogan B, editors, Proceedings of the 9th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM), 2015. AAAI Press. 2015. p. 622-625
Joiner, Richard ; Dapkeviciute, Lina ; Johnson, Helen ; Gavin, Jeffrey ; Brosnan, Mark. / Two studies investigating gender differences in response to facebook status updates. Proceedings of the 9th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM), 2015. editor / D. Quercia ; B. Hogan. AAAI Press, 2015. pp. 622-625
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