Through the looking glass

Focusing on long-term goals increases immanent justice reasoning

Mitchell J. Callan, Annelie J. Harvey, Rael J. Dawtry, Robbie M. Sutton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immanent justice reasoning involves causally attributing a negative event to someone's prior moral failings, even when such a causal connection is physically implausible. This study examined the degree to which immanent justice represents a form of motivated reasoning in the service of satisfying the need to believe in a just world. Drawing on a manipulation that has been shown to activate justice motivation, participants causally attributed a freak accident to a man's prior immoral (vs. moral) behaviour to a greater extent when they first focused on their long-term (vs. short-term) goals. These findings highlight the important function believing in a just world plays in self-regulatory processes by implicating the self in immanent justice reasoning about fluke events in the lives of others.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-385
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Social Psychology
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Social Justice
Glass
Trematoda
Ego
Accidents
Motivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Through the looking glass : Focusing on long-term goals increases immanent justice reasoning. / Callan, Mitchell J.; Harvey, Annelie J.; Dawtry, Rael J.; Sutton, Robbie M.

In: British Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 52, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 377-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Callan, Mitchell J. ; Harvey, Annelie J. ; Dawtry, Rael J. ; Sutton, Robbie M. / Through the looking glass : Focusing on long-term goals increases immanent justice reasoning. In: British Journal of Social Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 52, No. 2. pp. 377-385.
@article{f367684df15e404bb57b08fd8127eaa0,
title = "Through the looking glass: Focusing on long-term goals increases immanent justice reasoning",
abstract = "Immanent justice reasoning involves causally attributing a negative event to someone's prior moral failings, even when such a causal connection is physically implausible. This study examined the degree to which immanent justice represents a form of motivated reasoning in the service of satisfying the need to believe in a just world. Drawing on a manipulation that has been shown to activate justice motivation, participants causally attributed a freak accident to a man's prior immoral (vs. moral) behaviour to a greater extent when they first focused on their long-term (vs. short-term) goals. These findings highlight the important function believing in a just world plays in self-regulatory processes by implicating the self in immanent justice reasoning about fluke events in the lives of others.",
author = "Callan, {Mitchell J.} and Harvey, {Annelie J.} and Dawtry, {Rael J.} and Sutton, {Robbie M.}",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1111/bjso.12022",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "377--385",
journal = "British Journal of Social Psychology",
issn = "0144-6665",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Through the looking glass

T2 - Focusing on long-term goals increases immanent justice reasoning

AU - Callan, Mitchell J.

AU - Harvey, Annelie J.

AU - Dawtry, Rael J.

AU - Sutton, Robbie M.

PY - 2013/6

Y1 - 2013/6

N2 - Immanent justice reasoning involves causally attributing a negative event to someone's prior moral failings, even when such a causal connection is physically implausible. This study examined the degree to which immanent justice represents a form of motivated reasoning in the service of satisfying the need to believe in a just world. Drawing on a manipulation that has been shown to activate justice motivation, participants causally attributed a freak accident to a man's prior immoral (vs. moral) behaviour to a greater extent when they first focused on their long-term (vs. short-term) goals. These findings highlight the important function believing in a just world plays in self-regulatory processes by implicating the self in immanent justice reasoning about fluke events in the lives of others.

AB - Immanent justice reasoning involves causally attributing a negative event to someone's prior moral failings, even when such a causal connection is physically implausible. This study examined the degree to which immanent justice represents a form of motivated reasoning in the service of satisfying the need to believe in a just world. Drawing on a manipulation that has been shown to activate justice motivation, participants causally attributed a freak accident to a man's prior immoral (vs. moral) behaviour to a greater extent when they first focused on their long-term (vs. short-term) goals. These findings highlight the important function believing in a just world plays in self-regulatory processes by implicating the self in immanent justice reasoning about fluke events in the lives of others.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84878635647&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12022

U2 - 10.1111/bjso.12022

DO - 10.1111/bjso.12022

M3 - Article

VL - 52

SP - 377

EP - 385

JO - British Journal of Social Psychology

JF - British Journal of Social Psychology

SN - 0144-6665

IS - 2

ER -