Thou shalt not steal

effects of normative cues on attitudes towards theft

Judith De Groot, Wokje Abrahamse, Sarah Vincent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study, we examine how normative cues influence attitudes towards theft. In a 3 × 2 × 2 within-subjects design (N = 120), we found that people had more negative attitudes towards theft when: 1) a higher value item was stolen than when a lower value item was stolen; 2) the theft took place in a public setting than when it took place in a private setting; and 3) the theft took place in a tidy rather than messy setting. Furthermore, our findings showed interaction effects between the value of a stolen item and 1) the cleanliness of the environment; and 2) the privateness of a setting, on attitudes towards theft. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)438-444
JournalPsychology
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2013

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Thou shalt not steal : effects of normative cues on attitudes towards theft. / De Groot, Judith; Abrahamse, Wokje ; Vincent, Sarah.

In: Psychology, Vol. 4, No. 4, 24.04.2013, p. 438-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Groot, Judith ; Abrahamse, Wokje ; Vincent, Sarah. / Thou shalt not steal : effects of normative cues on attitudes towards theft. In: Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 438-444.
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