The use of incentives in the formation of healthy lifestyle habits following the school to work transition

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Much national and international resource has been directed at the question “can you pay people to be healthy?” Via a cluster randomized control trial, we tested whether rewards (4 x £10 vouchers) could incentivize school-leavers to engage into a healthy behavior initiative. Participants were allocated to three groups: control, behavioral support, and behavioral support with reward. The number of participants attending an initial appointment was higher for those gaining a reward. Yet of the 171 participants receiving incentives only 74 actually attended their first intervention appointment, reducing to only 18 at follow-up. These data speak toillustrate the weak motivational role that engagement-contingent rewards (i.e., that have no competence affirmation to counteract negative effects of feeling controlled) play in even the short-term enactment of very specific behaviors. A follow-up trial with 54 school-leavers showed informational rewards to better support engagement via providing supports for the participants’ autonomy and competence. Implications are discussed.

Conference

Conference5th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory
CountryUSA United States
CityRochester
Period27/06/1330/06/13

Fingerprint

Reward
Habits
Motivation
Mental Competency
Appointments and Schedules
Emotions
Healthy Lifestyle
Control Groups

Cite this

Standage, M., & Gillison, F. (2013). The use of incentives in the formation of healthy lifestyle habits following the school to work transition. Abstract from 5th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, Rochester, USA United States.

The use of incentives in the formation of healthy lifestyle habits following the school to work transition. / Standage, M; Gillison, F.

2013. Abstract from 5th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, Rochester, USA United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Standage, M & Gillison, F 2013, 'The use of incentives in the formation of healthy lifestyle habits following the school to work transition' 5th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, Rochester, USA United States, 27/06/13 - 30/06/13, .
Standage M, Gillison F. The use of incentives in the formation of healthy lifestyle habits following the school to work transition. 2013. Abstract from 5th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, Rochester, USA United States.
Standage, M ; Gillison, F. / The use of incentives in the formation of healthy lifestyle habits following the school to work transition. Abstract from 5th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, Rochester, USA United States.
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