The transmission of women's fertility, human capital, and work orientation across immigrant generations

Francine D. Blau, Lawrence M. Kahn, Albert Yung-Hsu Liu, Kerry L. Papps

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Abstract

Using the 1995–2011 Current Population Survey and 1970–2000 Census data, we find that the fertility, education and labour supply of second generation women (US-born women with at least one foreign-born parent) are significantly positively affected by the immigrant generation's levels of these variables, with the effect of the fertility and labour supply of women from the mother's source country generally larger than that of women from the father's source country and the effect of the education of men from the father's source country larger than that of women from the mother's source country. We present some evidence that suggests our findings for fertility and labour supply are due to at least in part to intergenerational transmission of gender roles. Transmission rates for immigrant fertility and labour supply between generations are higher than for education, but there is considerable intergenerational assimilation toward native levels for all three of these outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)405-435
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Population Economics
Volume26
Issue number2
Early online date14 Jun 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Keywords

  • Poverty, work and justice

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