The self survives extinction: Self-association biases attention in patients with visual extinction

Jie Sui, Glyn W. Humphreys

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
66 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

People show biases to self-related information on a range of tasks. Key but controversial questions are whether self-related information is processed without attention, and whether self-related information determines what is attended. We examined this using patients showing visual extinction. We had patients associated shapes with themselves or their best friend prior to carrying out a shape identification task. We demonstrate that extinction was modulated by whether patients associated stimuli with themselves or their best friend. Notably, patients were biased to identify their own shape relative to the shape associated with their friend, when the two shapes were placed in competition. This occurred even when the self-associated shape fell in the contralesional field. The data indicate that self-relatedness can be computed pre-attentively and can cue attention to regions of space that would otherwise be ignored by neuropsychological patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-256
Number of pages9
JournalCortex
Volume95
Early online date16 Aug 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Extinction
  • Personal association
  • Self

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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