The relationship between perceived training and development and employee retention: the mediating role of work attitudes

Luke Fletcher, Kerstin Alfes, Dilys Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper considers how utilizing a model of job-related affect can be used to explain the processes through which perceived training and development influence employee retention. We applied Russell’s model of core affect to categorize four different forms of work attitude, and positioned these as mediators of the relationship between perceived training and development and intention to stay. Using data from 1,191 employees across seven organizations, multilevel analyses found that job satisfaction, employee engagement, and change-related anxiety were significantly associated with intention to stay, and fully mediated the relationship between perceived training and development and intention to stay. Contrary to our hypotheses, emotional exhaustion was not significantly associated with intention to stay nor acted as a mediator when the other attitudes were included. These findings show the usefulness of Russell’s model of core affect in explaining the link between training and development and employee retention. Moreover, the findings collectively suggest that studies examining employee retention should include a wider range of work attitudes that highlight pleasant forms of affect.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2701-2728
Number of pages28
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume29
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • employee retention
  • perceived training and development
  • job related affect
  • multilevel analysis
  • work attitudes

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