The relationship between adverse interpersonal experiences and self-esteem in people with intellectual disabilities: the role of shame, self-compassion and social support

Lauren Evans, Cathy Randle-Phillips, Ailsa Russell, Claire Delaney

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2 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract


Background

People with intellectual disabilities are reported to have low self-esteem and to experience high rates of adverse interpersonal experiences (AIEs). This study aimed to investigate whether shame and self-compassion mediate the relationship between AIEs and self-esteem for people with intellectual disabilities and whether perceived social support moderates this relationship.
Method

This study employed a cross-sectional design, involving between-group comparisons. Forty-seven people with intellectual disabilities and 50 people without intellectual disabilities completed self-report questionnaires measuring shame, self-compassion, self-esteem, early AIEs and social support.
Results

Shame and self-compassion were found to mediate the relationship between AIEs and self-esteem for people with intellectual disabilities. There was no evidence for a moderating effect of social support and no difference between groups in shame or self-compassion.
Conclusions

The findings suggest shame and self-compassion are important concepts for people with intellectual disabilities. Clinical and research implications are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1037-1047
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume34
Issue number4
Early online date10 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2021

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