The peak duration-specific locomotor demands and concurrent collision frequencies of European Super League rugby

Dan Weaving, Thomas Sawczuk, Sean Williams, Tannath Scott, Kevin Till, Clive Beggs, Rich Johnston, Ben Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the most demanding passages of European Super League competition can optimise training prescription. We established positional and match half differences in peak relative distances (m·min −1) across durations, and the number of collisions, high-speed- and very-high-speed-distance completed in the peak 10 min period. Moving-averages (10 s, 30 s, 1 min, 5 min, 10 min) of instantaneous speed (m·s −1) were calculated from 25 professional rugby league players during 25 matches via microtechnology. Maximal m·min −1 was taken for each duration for each half. Concurrently, collisions (n), high-speed- (5 to 7 m·s −1; m) and very-high-speed-distance (> 7 m·s −1; m) were coded during each peak 10 min. Mixed-effects models determined differences between positions and halves. Aside from peak 10 s, trivial differences were observed in peak m·min −1 between positions or halves across durations. During peak 10 min periods, adjustables, full- and outside-backs ran more at high-speed and very-high-speed whilst middle- and edge-forwards completed more collisions. Peak m·min −1 is similar between positional groups across a range of durations and are maintained between halves of the match. Practitioners should consider that whilst the overall peak locomotor “intensity” is similar, how they achieve this differs between positions with forwards also exposed to additional collision bouts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)322-330
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume37
Issue number3
Early online date19 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • European Super League
  • Rugby league
  • collisions
  • global positioning systems
  • peak locomotor demands

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

The peak duration-specific locomotor demands and concurrent collision frequencies of European Super League rugby. / Weaving, Dan; Sawczuk, Thomas; Williams, Sean; Scott, Tannath ; Till, Kevin; Beggs, Clive; Johnston, Rich; Jones, Ben.

In: Journal of Sports Sciences, Vol. 37, No. 3, 2018, p. 322-330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weaving, Dan ; Sawczuk, Thomas ; Williams, Sean ; Scott, Tannath ; Till, Kevin ; Beggs, Clive ; Johnston, Rich ; Jones, Ben. / The peak duration-specific locomotor demands and concurrent collision frequencies of European Super League rugby. In: Journal of Sports Sciences. 2018 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 322-330.
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