The non-pest Australasian fungivore Cis bilamellatus Wood (Coleoptera: Ciidae) in northern Europe: spread dynamics, invasion success and ecological impact

G M Orledge, P A Smith, S E Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since its accidental introduction to south-east England during the nineteenth century, the invasive Australasian fungivore, Cis bilamellatus, has spread across England, Wales and Southern Scotland. Recently it has been recorded from Ireland, the Channel Islands and north-west France. On mainland Britain, an establishment phase spanning an estimated maximum of 45 years was followed by biphasic range expansion comprising a slow start of 1.6 km year(-1) between 1910 and 1930, followed by 40 years of approximately linear spread of 13 km year(-1). Northwards expansion now appears to be limited by sub-zero winter temperatures and is no longer apparent. Comparison with historic records of native ciids shows that this range expansion is genuine, rather than an artefact of recording effort or bias. It has no doubt been facilitated by C. bilamellatus' ability to exploit a wide range of sometimes under-used fungal resources, by its favourable rate of increase, by its tolerance of both wet and dry conditions, and by a low rate of parasitoid attack. Although there is the potential for direct and indirect interaction between C. bilamellatus, native ciids and their shared parasitoids, the current ecological impact of C. bilamellatus appears to be low. It seems likely that C. bilamellatus will spread through Europe, limited primarily by resource availability and low winter temperatures.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-530
Number of pages16
JournalBiological Invasions
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

colonizing ability
range expansion
Northern European region
ecological impact
England
Coleoptera
Channel Islands (United Kingdom)
winter
Wales
resource availability
parasitoid
nineteenth century
Ireland
Scotland
parasitoids
United Kingdom
artifact
temperature
tolerance
France

Cite this

@article{a05d2ca5d85a450486fe364260d1aad5,
title = "The non-pest Australasian fungivore Cis bilamellatus Wood (Coleoptera: Ciidae) in northern Europe: spread dynamics, invasion success and ecological impact",
abstract = "Since its accidental introduction to south-east England during the nineteenth century, the invasive Australasian fungivore, Cis bilamellatus, has spread across England, Wales and Southern Scotland. Recently it has been recorded from Ireland, the Channel Islands and north-west France. On mainland Britain, an establishment phase spanning an estimated maximum of 45 years was followed by biphasic range expansion comprising a slow start of 1.6 km year(-1) between 1910 and 1930, followed by 40 years of approximately linear spread of 13 km year(-1). Northwards expansion now appears to be limited by sub-zero winter temperatures and is no longer apparent. Comparison with historic records of native ciids shows that this range expansion is genuine, rather than an artefact of recording effort or bias. It has no doubt been facilitated by C. bilamellatus' ability to exploit a wide range of sometimes under-used fungal resources, by its favourable rate of increase, by its tolerance of both wet and dry conditions, and by a low rate of parasitoid attack. Although there is the potential for direct and indirect interaction between C. bilamellatus, native ciids and their shared parasitoids, the current ecological impact of C. bilamellatus appears to be low. It seems likely that C. bilamellatus will spread through Europe, limited primarily by resource availability and low winter temperatures.",
author = "Orledge, {G M} and Smith, {P A} and Reynolds, {S E}",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1007/s10530-009-9455-y",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "515--530",
journal = "Biological Invasions",
issn = "1387-3547",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The non-pest Australasian fungivore Cis bilamellatus Wood (Coleoptera: Ciidae) in northern Europe: spread dynamics, invasion success and ecological impact

AU - Orledge, G M

AU - Smith, P A

AU - Reynolds, S E

PY - 2010/3

Y1 - 2010/3

N2 - Since its accidental introduction to south-east England during the nineteenth century, the invasive Australasian fungivore, Cis bilamellatus, has spread across England, Wales and Southern Scotland. Recently it has been recorded from Ireland, the Channel Islands and north-west France. On mainland Britain, an establishment phase spanning an estimated maximum of 45 years was followed by biphasic range expansion comprising a slow start of 1.6 km year(-1) between 1910 and 1930, followed by 40 years of approximately linear spread of 13 km year(-1). Northwards expansion now appears to be limited by sub-zero winter temperatures and is no longer apparent. Comparison with historic records of native ciids shows that this range expansion is genuine, rather than an artefact of recording effort or bias. It has no doubt been facilitated by C. bilamellatus' ability to exploit a wide range of sometimes under-used fungal resources, by its favourable rate of increase, by its tolerance of both wet and dry conditions, and by a low rate of parasitoid attack. Although there is the potential for direct and indirect interaction between C. bilamellatus, native ciids and their shared parasitoids, the current ecological impact of C. bilamellatus appears to be low. It seems likely that C. bilamellatus will spread through Europe, limited primarily by resource availability and low winter temperatures.

AB - Since its accidental introduction to south-east England during the nineteenth century, the invasive Australasian fungivore, Cis bilamellatus, has spread across England, Wales and Southern Scotland. Recently it has been recorded from Ireland, the Channel Islands and north-west France. On mainland Britain, an establishment phase spanning an estimated maximum of 45 years was followed by biphasic range expansion comprising a slow start of 1.6 km year(-1) between 1910 and 1930, followed by 40 years of approximately linear spread of 13 km year(-1). Northwards expansion now appears to be limited by sub-zero winter temperatures and is no longer apparent. Comparison with historic records of native ciids shows that this range expansion is genuine, rather than an artefact of recording effort or bias. It has no doubt been facilitated by C. bilamellatus' ability to exploit a wide range of sometimes under-used fungal resources, by its favourable rate of increase, by its tolerance of both wet and dry conditions, and by a low rate of parasitoid attack. Although there is the potential for direct and indirect interaction between C. bilamellatus, native ciids and their shared parasitoids, the current ecological impact of C. bilamellatus appears to be low. It seems likely that C. bilamellatus will spread through Europe, limited primarily by resource availability and low winter temperatures.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77952875656&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-009-9455-y

U2 - 10.1007/s10530-009-9455-y

DO - 10.1007/s10530-009-9455-y

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 515

EP - 530

JO - Biological Invasions

JF - Biological Invasions

SN - 1387-3547

IS - 3

ER -