The influence of the perpetrator-target relationship on perceptions of stalking in mock-jury deliberations

A J Scott, J Gavin

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Research has shown that a variety of personal and situational characteristics can influence whether behaviour is perceived to constitute stalking, cause alarm or personal distress, and necessitate police intervention. The manner in which this research is framed may produce a confirmatory bias, however, whereby participants focus on the stalking consistent information while disregarding any inconsistent information. The present study utilises hypothetical vignettes and a sample of 265 university students to investigate the influence of framing (stalking, harassment, illegal) and the perpetrator-target relationship (stranger, acquaintance, ex-partner) on perceptions of behaviour. The statistical analyses reveal that participants are more willing to categorise the same behaviour as stalking (67%) or harassment (75%) than to categorise it as illegal (20%). Participants are also more likely to classify behaviour as stalking, harassment or illegal when the perpetrator and target are depicted as strangers (62%) rather than ex-partners (45%).
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009
EventDivision of Forensic Psychology Conference 2009 - University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 23 Jun 200925 Jun 2009

Conference

ConferenceDivision of Forensic Psychology Conference 2009
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityUniversity of Central Lancashire, Preston
Period23/06/0925/06/09

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Cite this

Scott, A. J., & Gavin, J. (2009). The influence of the perpetrator-target relationship on perceptions of stalking in mock-jury deliberations. Poster session presented at Division of Forensic Psychology Conference 2009, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK United Kingdom.

The influence of the perpetrator-target relationship on perceptions of stalking in mock-jury deliberations. / Scott, A J; Gavin, J.

2009. Poster session presented at Division of Forensic Psychology Conference 2009, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Scott, AJ & Gavin, J 2009, 'The influence of the perpetrator-target relationship on perceptions of stalking in mock-jury deliberations', Division of Forensic Psychology Conference 2009, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK United Kingdom, 23/06/09 - 25/06/09.
Scott AJ, Gavin J. The influence of the perpetrator-target relationship on perceptions of stalking in mock-jury deliberations. 2009. Poster session presented at Division of Forensic Psychology Conference 2009, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK United Kingdom.
Scott, A J ; Gavin, J. / The influence of the perpetrator-target relationship on perceptions of stalking in mock-jury deliberations. Poster session presented at Division of Forensic Psychology Conference 2009, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK United Kingdom.
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