The influence of prior relationship on perceptions of stalking in the United Kingdom and Australia

A J Scott, R Lloyd, Jeffrey Gavin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research in the United Kingdom and Australia has produced inconsistent findings regarding the influence of the prior relationship between the perpetrator and the target on perceptions of stalking. It is unclear whether these inconsistencies represent a genuine cross-cultural difference. The current study investigates the influence of prior relationship and the nationality of participants on perceptions of stalking with a combined sample of 315 university students from the United Kingdom and Australia. Overall, perceptions failed to reflect the reality that ex-partner stalkers pose a greater threat than stranger or acquaintance stalkers. Participants were more likely to believe that behavior constituted stalking, necessitated police intervention, caused fear or apprehension, and caused mental or physical harm when the perpetrator was depicted as a stranger rather than an acquaintance or ex-partner. The direction of findings was consistent in the United Kingdom and Australia, although Australian participants perceived the perpetrator's behavior to be more severe than did participants from the United Kingdom.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1185-1194
Number of pages10
JournalCriminal Justice and Behavior
Volume37
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

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Stalking
stalking
Police
nationality
Ethnic Groups
cultural difference
Fear
police
threat
Students
anxiety
United Kingdom
university
Research
student

Keywords

  • perceptions
  • just world hypothesis
  • harassment
  • stalking
  • cross-cultural

Cite this

The influence of prior relationship on perceptions of stalking in the United Kingdom and Australia. / Scott, A J; Lloyd, R; Gavin, Jeffrey.

In: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Vol. 37, No. 11, 11.2010, p. 1185-1194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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