The effects of nicotine dependence and acute abstinence on the processing of drug and non-drug rewards

W Lawn, T P Freeman, C Hindocha, C Mokrysz, R K Das, C J A Morgan, H V Curran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

RATIONALE: Drug addiction may be characterised by a hypersensitivity to drug rewards and a hyposensitivity to non-drug rewards. This imbalance may become further polarised during acute abstinence.

OBJECTIVES: (i) Examine the differences between dependent and occasional smokers in choices for, motivation for and self-reported wanting and liking of cigarette and non-drug rewards. (ii) Examine the effects of 12-h nicotine abstinence on these metrics.

METHODS: Dependent (n = 20) and occasional, non-dependent smokers (n = 20) were tested after ad libitum smoking and ≥12-h of nicotine abstinence. A novel task was developed (Drug, Reward and Motivation-Choice (DReaM-Choice)) in which different rewards (cigarettes, music and chocolate) could be won. In each trial, participants chose between two rewards and then could earn the chosen reward via repeated button-pressing. Participants subsequently 'consumed' and rated subjective liking of the rewards they had won.

RESULTS: Compared with occasional smokers, dependent smokers made more choices for (p < 0.001), pressed more for (p = 0.046) and reported more wanting (p = 0.007) and liking (p < 0.001) of cigarettes, and also made fewer choices for chocolate (p = 0.005). There were no differences between the groups on button-pressing for chocolate or music. However, the balance between drug and non-drug reward processing was different between the groups across all metrics. Twelve-hour nicotine abstinence led to more cigarette choices (p < 0.001) and fewer music choices (p = 0.042) in both groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Nicotine dependence was associated with a hypersensitivity to cigarette rewards, but we found little evidence indicating a hyposensitivity to non-drug rewards. Our findings question the moderating influence of dependence on how acute nicotine abstinence affects reward processing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2503-2517
Number of pages15
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume232
Issue number14
Early online date12 Mar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Disorder
Reward
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Tobacco Products
Nicotine
Music
Motivation
Drug Hypersensitivity
Substance-Related Disorders
Hypersensitivity
Smoking

Keywords

  • Carbon Monoxide/metabolism
  • Choice Behavior/drug effects
  • Craving
  • Cross-Over Studies
  • Depression/psychology
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Motivation/drug effects
  • Nicotine/pharmacology
  • Pleasure/drug effects
  • Psychomotor Performance/drug effects
  • Reading
  • Reward
  • Substance Withdrawal Syndrome/psychology
  • Tobacco Use Disorder/psychology
  • Young Adult

Cite this

The effects of nicotine dependence and acute abstinence on the processing of drug and non-drug rewards. / Lawn, W; Freeman, T P; Hindocha, C; Mokrysz, C; Das, R K; Morgan, C J A; Curran, H V.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 232, No. 14, 01.07.2015, p. 2503-2517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lawn, W ; Freeman, T P ; Hindocha, C ; Mokrysz, C ; Das, R K ; Morgan, C J A ; Curran, H V. / The effects of nicotine dependence and acute abstinence on the processing of drug and non-drug rewards. In: Psychopharmacology. 2015 ; Vol. 232, No. 14. pp. 2503-2517.
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abstract = "RATIONALE: Drug addiction may be characterised by a hypersensitivity to drug rewards and a hyposensitivity to non-drug rewards. This imbalance may become further polarised during acute abstinence.OBJECTIVES: (i) Examine the differences between dependent and occasional smokers in choices for, motivation for and self-reported wanting and liking of cigarette and non-drug rewards. (ii) Examine the effects of 12-h nicotine abstinence on these metrics.METHODS: Dependent (n = 20) and occasional, non-dependent smokers (n = 20) were tested after ad libitum smoking and ≥12-h of nicotine abstinence. A novel task was developed (Drug, Reward and Motivation-Choice (DReaM-Choice)) in which different rewards (cigarettes, music and chocolate) could be won. In each trial, participants chose between two rewards and then could earn the chosen reward via repeated button-pressing. Participants subsequently 'consumed' and rated subjective liking of the rewards they had won.RESULTS: Compared with occasional smokers, dependent smokers made more choices for (p < 0.001), pressed more for (p = 0.046) and reported more wanting (p = 0.007) and liking (p < 0.001) of cigarettes, and also made fewer choices for chocolate (p = 0.005). There were no differences between the groups on button-pressing for chocolate or music. However, the balance between drug and non-drug reward processing was different between the groups across all metrics. Twelve-hour nicotine abstinence led to more cigarette choices (p < 0.001) and fewer music choices (p = 0.042) in both groups.CONCLUSIONS: Nicotine dependence was associated with a hypersensitivity to cigarette rewards, but we found little evidence indicating a hyposensitivity to non-drug rewards. Our findings question the moderating influence of dependence on how acute nicotine abstinence affects reward processing.",
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T1 - The effects of nicotine dependence and acute abstinence on the processing of drug and non-drug rewards

AU - Lawn, W

AU - Freeman, T P

AU - Hindocha, C

AU - Mokrysz, C

AU - Das, R K

AU - Morgan, C J A

AU - Curran, H V

PY - 2015/7/1

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N2 - RATIONALE: Drug addiction may be characterised by a hypersensitivity to drug rewards and a hyposensitivity to non-drug rewards. This imbalance may become further polarised during acute abstinence.OBJECTIVES: (i) Examine the differences between dependent and occasional smokers in choices for, motivation for and self-reported wanting and liking of cigarette and non-drug rewards. (ii) Examine the effects of 12-h nicotine abstinence on these metrics.METHODS: Dependent (n = 20) and occasional, non-dependent smokers (n = 20) were tested after ad libitum smoking and ≥12-h of nicotine abstinence. A novel task was developed (Drug, Reward and Motivation-Choice (DReaM-Choice)) in which different rewards (cigarettes, music and chocolate) could be won. In each trial, participants chose between two rewards and then could earn the chosen reward via repeated button-pressing. Participants subsequently 'consumed' and rated subjective liking of the rewards they had won.RESULTS: Compared with occasional smokers, dependent smokers made more choices for (p < 0.001), pressed more for (p = 0.046) and reported more wanting (p = 0.007) and liking (p < 0.001) of cigarettes, and also made fewer choices for chocolate (p = 0.005). There were no differences between the groups on button-pressing for chocolate or music. However, the balance between drug and non-drug reward processing was different between the groups across all metrics. Twelve-hour nicotine abstinence led to more cigarette choices (p < 0.001) and fewer music choices (p = 0.042) in both groups.CONCLUSIONS: Nicotine dependence was associated with a hypersensitivity to cigarette rewards, but we found little evidence indicating a hyposensitivity to non-drug rewards. Our findings question the moderating influence of dependence on how acute nicotine abstinence affects reward processing.

AB - RATIONALE: Drug addiction may be characterised by a hypersensitivity to drug rewards and a hyposensitivity to non-drug rewards. This imbalance may become further polarised during acute abstinence.OBJECTIVES: (i) Examine the differences between dependent and occasional smokers in choices for, motivation for and self-reported wanting and liking of cigarette and non-drug rewards. (ii) Examine the effects of 12-h nicotine abstinence on these metrics.METHODS: Dependent (n = 20) and occasional, non-dependent smokers (n = 20) were tested after ad libitum smoking and ≥12-h of nicotine abstinence. A novel task was developed (Drug, Reward and Motivation-Choice (DReaM-Choice)) in which different rewards (cigarettes, music and chocolate) could be won. In each trial, participants chose between two rewards and then could earn the chosen reward via repeated button-pressing. Participants subsequently 'consumed' and rated subjective liking of the rewards they had won.RESULTS: Compared with occasional smokers, dependent smokers made more choices for (p < 0.001), pressed more for (p = 0.046) and reported more wanting (p = 0.007) and liking (p < 0.001) of cigarettes, and also made fewer choices for chocolate (p = 0.005). There were no differences between the groups on button-pressing for chocolate or music. However, the balance between drug and non-drug reward processing was different between the groups across all metrics. Twelve-hour nicotine abstinence led to more cigarette choices (p < 0.001) and fewer music choices (p = 0.042) in both groups.CONCLUSIONS: Nicotine dependence was associated with a hypersensitivity to cigarette rewards, but we found little evidence indicating a hyposensitivity to non-drug rewards. Our findings question the moderating influence of dependence on how acute nicotine abstinence affects reward processing.

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KW - Choice Behavior/drug effects

KW - Craving

KW - Cross-Over Studies

KW - Depression/psychology

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Motivation/drug effects

KW - Nicotine/pharmacology

KW - Pleasure/drug effects

KW - Psychomotor Performance/drug effects

KW - Reading

KW - Reward

KW - Substance Withdrawal Syndrome/psychology

KW - Tobacco Use Disorder/psychology

KW - Young Adult

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JO - Psychopharmacology

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