The effects of mother training in emotion-rich, elaborative reminiscing on children's shared recall and emotion knowledge

Penny Van Bergen, Karen Salmon, Mark R. Dadds, Jennifer Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the impact of training mothers in high-elaborative, emotional reminiscing on children's autobiographical memory and emotion knowledge. Eighty mothers were randomly allocated to one of two training conditions: in the reminiscing condition, mothers were encouraged to reminisce by asking their children (aged 3.5 to 5 years) elaborative Wh- questions, providing detailed descriptions, and discussing emotions, and in the control condition, mothers were encouraged to play by following their children's lead. Forty-four mothers completed the study. Both immediately and 6 months after training, mothers in the reminiscing condition and their children each made more high-elaborative utterances and emotion references during shared recall than did mothers in the control condition and their children. Children of reminiscing mothers also showed better emotion cause knowledge after 6 months than did children of control mothers, but children's independent recall to an experimenter did not differ according to condition. The findings suggest that an elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing style can be taught to parents, with potential benefits for children's shared (but not independent) memory contributions and for emotion knowledge development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-187
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Cognition and Development
Volume10
Issue number3
Early online date3 Sep 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Sep 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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