The costs of exhibiting organizational citizenship behaviour

Stephen Deery, Bruce Rayton, Janet Walsh, Nicholas Kinnie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)
67 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) has been associated with positive organizational outcomes and with higher managerial ratings of employee performance. However, concerns have been raised about the possible personal costs of performing such activities. This paper examines the relationship between OCB and emotional exhaustion and work-family conflict and explores the moderating role of job performance in shaping those relationships. In a time-lagged field study of customer-contact center employees the research found that one particular dimension of OCB – conscientiousness – was associated with higher emotional exhaustion and with work-family conflict. The study also revealed that conscientious employees who performed their in-role job responsibilities at a high level experienced greater emotional exhaustion and work-family conflict than conscientious employees who performed their in-role job responsibilities at a low level. Our findings suggest that organizational pressures to increase the level at which both discretionary and formal role obligations are performed can carry negative consequences for employees.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1039-1049
Number of pages28
JournalHuman Resource Management
Volume56
Issue number6
Early online date6 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2017

Fingerprint

Personnel
Costs and Cost Analysis
Costs
Personnel rating
Pressure
Research
Organizational citizenship behavior
Employees
Emotional exhaustion
Work-family conflict
Responsibility
Work Performance
Job performance
Conscientiousness
Employee performance
Field study
Rating
Customer contact
Contact center
Obligation

Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • emotional exhaustion
  • organizational citizenship behavior
  • job performance
  • work-family confllict

Cite this

The costs of exhibiting organizational citizenship behaviour. / Deery, Stephen; Rayton, Bruce; Walsh, Janet; Kinnie, Nicholas.

In: Human Resource Management, Vol. 56, No. 6, 01.11.2017, p. 1039-1049.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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