Abstract

Confabulation is a technical term for a process typically ascribed to patients who have problems with their memory or their self awareness. We ask a patient why they have done something, and they tell us a narrative that sounds like a memory, but that we know to be false. So we say that the patient has confabulated. Their unconscious (but still diseased) mind has drawn together disparate stories in a desperate attempt to make their recent actions—and lives—make sense.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMemory in the Twenty-First Century
Subtitle of host publicationNew Critical Perspectives from the Arts, Humanities, and Sciences
EditorsS. Groes
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages334-337
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781349566426
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

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Bryson, J. J. (2016). The confabulation of self. In S. Groes (Ed.), Memory in the Twenty-First Century: New Critical Perspectives from the Arts, Humanities, and Sciences (pp. 334-337). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137520586_41