Temporal dynamics of speech and gesture in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Anna Lambrechts, Sebastian Gaigg, Kielan Yarrow, Katie Maras, Riccardo Fusaroli

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)
93 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by difficulties in communication and social interaction. Abnormalities in the use of gestures or flow of conversation are frequently reported in clinical observations and contribute to a diagnosis of the disorder but the mechanisms underlying these communication difficulties remain unclear. In the present study, we examine the hypothesis that the temporal dynamics of speech and gesture production is atypical in ASD and affects the overall quality of communication. The context of a previously published study of memory in ASD (Maras et al., 2013) provided the opportunity to examine video recordings of 17 ASD and 17 TD adults attempting to recall details of a standardized event they had participated in (a first aid scenario). Results indicated no group difference in the use and coordination of speech and gesture: both groups produced the same quantity of movement over time (t(33)=-0.165, p>.8), and gestures were produced within the same time window and with a similar distribution by ASD and TD individuals (η2p=.042). Similarly, no group differences were found in the subjective ratings on the quality of communication: in both groups the use of gestures improved comprehension and engagement from the listener. Overall the current data do not suggest that ASD individuals experience more difficulties than TD participants in time processes relevant to communicating personally experienced events. However large inter-individual differences could contribute to communication difficulties in some participants. It will be important for future studies to examine the timing of communicative behaviors during reciprocal interactions, that place demands not only on coordinating speech with gesture but to coordinate one's own behavior with that of others.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014 - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Pages349-352
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014 - Vietri sul Mare, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 5 Nov 20147 Nov 2014

Conference

Conference5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityVietri sul Mare
Period5/11/147/11/14

Fingerprint

Gestures
Communication
Video Recording
First Aid
Interpersonal Relations
Individuality
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Keywords

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Communication
  • Gesture
  • Speech
  • Temporal dynamics

Cite this

Lambrechts, A., Gaigg, S., Yarrow, K., Maras, K., & Fusaroli, R. (2014). Temporal dynamics of speech and gesture in Autism Spectrum Disorder. In 5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014 - Proceedings (pp. 349-352). [7020477] IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/CogInfoCom.2014.7020477

Temporal dynamics of speech and gesture in Autism Spectrum Disorder. / Lambrechts, Anna; Gaigg, Sebastian; Yarrow, Kielan; Maras, Katie; Fusaroli, Riccardo.

5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014 - Proceedings. IEEE, 2014. p. 349-352 7020477.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lambrechts, A, Gaigg, S, Yarrow, K, Maras, K & Fusaroli, R 2014, Temporal dynamics of speech and gesture in Autism Spectrum Disorder. in 5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014 - Proceedings., 7020477, IEEE, pp. 349-352, 5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014, Vietri sul Mare, UK United Kingdom, 5/11/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/CogInfoCom.2014.7020477
Lambrechts A, Gaigg S, Yarrow K, Maras K, Fusaroli R. Temporal dynamics of speech and gesture in Autism Spectrum Disorder. In 5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014 - Proceedings. IEEE. 2014. p. 349-352. 7020477 https://doi.org/10.1109/CogInfoCom.2014.7020477
Lambrechts, Anna ; Gaigg, Sebastian ; Yarrow, Kielan ; Maras, Katie ; Fusaroli, Riccardo. / Temporal dynamics of speech and gesture in Autism Spectrum Disorder. 5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014 - Proceedings. IEEE, 2014. pp. 349-352
@inproceedings{33bc0e7f4e124480bbc7e4230a3da8f5,
title = "Temporal dynamics of speech and gesture in Autism Spectrum Disorder",
abstract = "Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by difficulties in communication and social interaction. Abnormalities in the use of gestures or flow of conversation are frequently reported in clinical observations and contribute to a diagnosis of the disorder but the mechanisms underlying these communication difficulties remain unclear. In the present study, we examine the hypothesis that the temporal dynamics of speech and gesture production is atypical in ASD and affects the overall quality of communication. The context of a previously published study of memory in ASD (Maras et al., 2013) provided the opportunity to examine video recordings of 17 ASD and 17 TD adults attempting to recall details of a standardized event they had participated in (a first aid scenario). Results indicated no group difference in the use and coordination of speech and gesture: both groups produced the same quantity of movement over time (t(33)=-0.165, p>.8), and gestures were produced within the same time window and with a similar distribution by ASD and TD individuals (η2p=.042). Similarly, no group differences were found in the subjective ratings on the quality of communication: in both groups the use of gestures improved comprehension and engagement from the listener. Overall the current data do not suggest that ASD individuals experience more difficulties than TD participants in time processes relevant to communicating personally experienced events. However large inter-individual differences could contribute to communication difficulties in some participants. It will be important for future studies to examine the timing of communicative behaviors during reciprocal interactions, that place demands not only on coordinating speech with gesture but to coordinate one's own behavior with that of others.",
keywords = "Autism Spectrum Disorder, Communication, Gesture, Speech, Temporal dynamics",
author = "Anna Lambrechts and Sebastian Gaigg and Kielan Yarrow and Katie Maras and Riccardo Fusaroli",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1109/CogInfoCom.2014.7020477",
language = "English",
pages = "349--352",
booktitle = "5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014 - Proceedings",
publisher = "IEEE",
address = "USA United States",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Temporal dynamics of speech and gesture in Autism Spectrum Disorder

AU - Lambrechts, Anna

AU - Gaigg, Sebastian

AU - Yarrow, Kielan

AU - Maras, Katie

AU - Fusaroli, Riccardo

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by difficulties in communication and social interaction. Abnormalities in the use of gestures or flow of conversation are frequently reported in clinical observations and contribute to a diagnosis of the disorder but the mechanisms underlying these communication difficulties remain unclear. In the present study, we examine the hypothesis that the temporal dynamics of speech and gesture production is atypical in ASD and affects the overall quality of communication. The context of a previously published study of memory in ASD (Maras et al., 2013) provided the opportunity to examine video recordings of 17 ASD and 17 TD adults attempting to recall details of a standardized event they had participated in (a first aid scenario). Results indicated no group difference in the use and coordination of speech and gesture: both groups produced the same quantity of movement over time (t(33)=-0.165, p>.8), and gestures were produced within the same time window and with a similar distribution by ASD and TD individuals (η2p=.042). Similarly, no group differences were found in the subjective ratings on the quality of communication: in both groups the use of gestures improved comprehension and engagement from the listener. Overall the current data do not suggest that ASD individuals experience more difficulties than TD participants in time processes relevant to communicating personally experienced events. However large inter-individual differences could contribute to communication difficulties in some participants. It will be important for future studies to examine the timing of communicative behaviors during reciprocal interactions, that place demands not only on coordinating speech with gesture but to coordinate one's own behavior with that of others.

AB - Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by difficulties in communication and social interaction. Abnormalities in the use of gestures or flow of conversation are frequently reported in clinical observations and contribute to a diagnosis of the disorder but the mechanisms underlying these communication difficulties remain unclear. In the present study, we examine the hypothesis that the temporal dynamics of speech and gesture production is atypical in ASD and affects the overall quality of communication. The context of a previously published study of memory in ASD (Maras et al., 2013) provided the opportunity to examine video recordings of 17 ASD and 17 TD adults attempting to recall details of a standardized event they had participated in (a first aid scenario). Results indicated no group difference in the use and coordination of speech and gesture: both groups produced the same quantity of movement over time (t(33)=-0.165, p>.8), and gestures were produced within the same time window and with a similar distribution by ASD and TD individuals (η2p=.042). Similarly, no group differences were found in the subjective ratings on the quality of communication: in both groups the use of gestures improved comprehension and engagement from the listener. Overall the current data do not suggest that ASD individuals experience more difficulties than TD participants in time processes relevant to communicating personally experienced events. However large inter-individual differences could contribute to communication difficulties in some participants. It will be important for future studies to examine the timing of communicative behaviors during reciprocal interactions, that place demands not only on coordinating speech with gesture but to coordinate one's own behavior with that of others.

KW - Autism Spectrum Disorder

KW - Communication

KW - Gesture

KW - Speech

KW - Temporal dynamics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84923391737&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/CogInfoCom.2014.7020477

U2 - 10.1109/CogInfoCom.2014.7020477

DO - 10.1109/CogInfoCom.2014.7020477

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 349

EP - 352

BT - 5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications, CogInfoCom 2014 - Proceedings

PB - IEEE

ER -