Technology matters : Online, self-help Single Session Interventions could expand current provision, improving early access to help for young people with depression symptoms, including minority groups

Maria E. Loades, Jessica L. Schleider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Current mental health service provision for young people was primarily designed based on an assumption of repeat attendance to enable access to interventions. This applies to in-person therapy and, in recent years, digitally provided apps and programmes. Yet, discontinuation after only one or two attendances or uses is a common problem. However, there is a different model, which is intentionally designing provision without assuming repeat attendance, that is, single session interventions. Evidence from the United States, where a suite of digital, self-help single session interventions, accessible anonymously, have been designed, indicates that these are helpful to young people with reductions in depression symptoms at up to 9 months later. These interventions also have had better reach into currently underserved populations (e.g. LGBTQ+ and ethnic minority adolescents). Therefore, these may be a potentially helpful way to expand existing provision at scale, enabling all young people to access evidence-based help quickly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559-561
Number of pages3
JournalChild and Adolescent Mental Health
Volume28
Issue number4
Early online date6 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Nov 2023

Bibliographical note

MEL (Development and Skills Enhancement Award, 302367) is funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) for this research project. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR, NHS or the UK Department of Health and Social Care.. JLS receives funding from the National Institute of Health Office of the Director (DP5OD028123), National Institute of Mental Health (R43MH128075), National Science Foundation (2141710), Health Research and Services Association (U3NHP45406-01-00), the Society for Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, and the Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation. Preparation of this article was supported in part by the Implementation Research Institute (IRI), at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis; through an award from the National Institute of Mental Health (R25MH080916; JLS is an IRI Fellow).

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • intervention
  • mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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