Abstract

BACKGROUND: Microbial oils, often termed single cell oils (SCOs), offer an alternative to terrestrial oil crops across the energy, food, and chemical industries. In addition to oils, a range of secondary metabolites can be produced from the heterotrophic organisms as part of a bio-refinery system. Techno-economic analysis (TEA) is an important tool for evaluating economic viability, and while TEA is subject to high uncertainties where production is still at the laboratory scale, the tool can play a significant role in directing further research to evaluate suitability of scale-up.

RESULTS: SCO production from the oleaginous yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima using sucrose, wheat straw and distillery waste feedstocks was evaluated at two production scales. At a scale of 100 tonnes a-1 oil production a minimum estimated selling price (MESP) of €14k per tonne was determined for sucrose. This reduced to €4-8k per tonne on scaling to 10,000 tonne a-1, with sucrose and wheat straw yielding the lowest MESP.

CONCLUSIONS: Feedstock price and lipid yield had the greatest impact on overall economic return, though the valorisation of co-products also had a large effect, and further play between feedstock and system productivity strategies could bring the price down to be competitive with terrestrial oils in the future. The novel approach demonstrated here for the first time integrates uncertainty into economic analysis whilst facilitating decision-support at anearly technology development stage.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)701-711
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology
Volume94
Issue number3
Early online date3 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

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Economic analysis
economic analysis
oil production
Uncertainty
Oils
Economics
sucrose
oil
resource
Sugar (sucrose)
Feedstocks
Sucrose
straw
Straw
wheat
Triticum
Metschnikowia
Sales
food industry
technological development

Keywords

  • TEA
  • biorefinery
  • microbial oil
  • single cell oil
  • techno-economic analysis
  • uncertainty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Fuel Technology
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

Cite this

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title = "Techno-economic analysis (TEA) of microbial oil production from waste resources as part of a bio-refinery concept: assessment at multiple scales under uncertainty",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Microbial oils, often termed single cell oils (SCOs), offer an alternative to terrestrial oil crops across the energy, food, and chemical industries. In addition to oils, a range of secondary metabolites can be produced from the heterotrophic organisms as part of a bio-refinery system. Techno-economic analysis (TEA) is an important tool for evaluating economic viability, and while TEA is subject to high uncertainties where production is still at the laboratory scale, the tool can play a significant role in directing further research to evaluate suitability of scale-up. RESULTS: SCO production from the oleaginous yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima using sucrose, wheat straw and distillery waste feedstocks was evaluated at two production scales. At a scale of 100 tonnes a-1 oil production a minimum estimated selling price (MESP) of €14k per tonne was determined for sucrose. This reduced to €4-8k per tonne on scaling to 10,000 tonne a-1, with sucrose and wheat straw yielding the lowest MESP. CONCLUSIONS: Feedstock price and lipid yield had the greatest impact on overall economic return, though the valorisation of co-products also had a large effect, and further play between feedstock and system productivity strategies could bring the price down to be competitive with terrestrial oils in the future. The novel approach demonstrated here for the first time integrates uncertainty into economic analysis whilst facilitating decision-support at anearly technology development stage.",
keywords = "TEA, biorefinery, microbial oil, single cell oil, techno-economic analysis, uncertainty",
author = "Sophie Parsons and Felix Abeln and Marcelle McManus and Christopher Chuck",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jctb.5811",
language = "English",
volume = "94",
pages = "701--711",
journal = "Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology",
issn = "0268-2575",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
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T1 - Techno-economic analysis (TEA) of microbial oil production from waste resources as part of a bio-refinery concept: assessment at multiple scales under uncertainty

AU - Parsons, Sophie

AU - Abeln, Felix

AU - McManus, Marcelle

AU - Chuck, Christopher

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Microbial oils, often termed single cell oils (SCOs), offer an alternative to terrestrial oil crops across the energy, food, and chemical industries. In addition to oils, a range of secondary metabolites can be produced from the heterotrophic organisms as part of a bio-refinery system. Techno-economic analysis (TEA) is an important tool for evaluating economic viability, and while TEA is subject to high uncertainties where production is still at the laboratory scale, the tool can play a significant role in directing further research to evaluate suitability of scale-up. RESULTS: SCO production from the oleaginous yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima using sucrose, wheat straw and distillery waste feedstocks was evaluated at two production scales. At a scale of 100 tonnes a-1 oil production a minimum estimated selling price (MESP) of €14k per tonne was determined for sucrose. This reduced to €4-8k per tonne on scaling to 10,000 tonne a-1, with sucrose and wheat straw yielding the lowest MESP. CONCLUSIONS: Feedstock price and lipid yield had the greatest impact on overall economic return, though the valorisation of co-products also had a large effect, and further play between feedstock and system productivity strategies could bring the price down to be competitive with terrestrial oils in the future. The novel approach demonstrated here for the first time integrates uncertainty into economic analysis whilst facilitating decision-support at anearly technology development stage.

AB - BACKGROUND: Microbial oils, often termed single cell oils (SCOs), offer an alternative to terrestrial oil crops across the energy, food, and chemical industries. In addition to oils, a range of secondary metabolites can be produced from the heterotrophic organisms as part of a bio-refinery system. Techno-economic analysis (TEA) is an important tool for evaluating economic viability, and while TEA is subject to high uncertainties where production is still at the laboratory scale, the tool can play a significant role in directing further research to evaluate suitability of scale-up. RESULTS: SCO production from the oleaginous yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima using sucrose, wheat straw and distillery waste feedstocks was evaluated at two production scales. At a scale of 100 tonnes a-1 oil production a minimum estimated selling price (MESP) of €14k per tonne was determined for sucrose. This reduced to €4-8k per tonne on scaling to 10,000 tonne a-1, with sucrose and wheat straw yielding the lowest MESP. CONCLUSIONS: Feedstock price and lipid yield had the greatest impact on overall economic return, though the valorisation of co-products also had a large effect, and further play between feedstock and system productivity strategies could bring the price down to be competitive with terrestrial oils in the future. The novel approach demonstrated here for the first time integrates uncertainty into economic analysis whilst facilitating decision-support at anearly technology development stage.

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