Taking things apart: Ovario-hysterectomy - Textbook knowledge and actual practice in veterinary surgery

D Woodgate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Veterinary surgery provides an interesting context in which to address important questions about the links between formal 'book' learning and actual, personal experience of the phenomena in question, and to examine the processes through which these links are forged. Participant observation of surgical procedures suggests that surgeons initially learn about anatomy from books, pictures and demonstrations, and become skilled 'operators' through the application of enhancement and reduction procedures that have the effect of transforming the living body into something more closely resembling anatomical pictures of it. Some of these procedures can be seen as a set of formalized 'rules' for performing operations, and like most rules, they appear to decrease in importance as a surgeon gains experience. They may, however, regain importance when a practitioner meets with an anatomical variant that he or she has not previously encountered. Other practices appear to be less formalized, requiring creative, constructive use of visual aids or language practices outside formal textbook knowledge. The links between actual bodies (and operations) and textbook representations of them are thus formed within a community of 'operators'.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)367-397
Number of pages31
JournalSocial Studies of Science
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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surgery
textbook
participant observation
experience
language
learning
community
Surgery
Hysterectomy
Textbooks
Surgeon
Operator
Visual Aids
Picture Books
Participant Observation
Language Practices
Personal Experience
Visual Languages
Enhancement
Living Body

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Taking things apart: Ovario-hysterectomy - Textbook knowledge and actual practice in veterinary surgery. / Woodgate, D.

In: Social Studies of Science, Vol. 36, No. 3, 2006, p. 367-397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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