Taking shortcuts: Embedded physical interfaces for spatial navigation

Douglas Boari, Mike Fraser

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Designing for embodied physical interaction is just as important at a coarse level of spatial navigation as in the minutiae of object exploration. We created interactive embedded interfaces called 'Navitiles' that can be suspended in a floor to support navigation of a building. Our design uses capacitance and RFID sensors to determine users' location and LEDs to indicate possible directions. We determine whether Navitile cues could help users understand spatial relationships between points of interest. We based our study on a previous experiment that used a simulated VR maze to test whether users were able to exhibit 'shortcut' behaviour that would indicate the formation of spatial maps. Our hypothesis was that the physicality of embodied spatial navigation directed by the Navitiles in a real maze would enable users to achieve similar spatial shortcut behaviours to those found in the virtual task. We found significant evidence that sufficient spatial knowledge was acquired to enable successful shortcut performance between unexplored routes. However, further work is required to measure the effect of physical body movement on spatial skills development.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction, TEI'09
Pages189-196
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Sep 2009
Event3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction, TEI'09 - Cambridge, USA United States
Duration: 16 Feb 200918 Feb 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction, TEI'09

Conference

Conference3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction, TEI'09
CountryUSA United States
CityCambridge
Period16/02/0918/02/09

Keywords

  • Interactive embedded interfaces
  • Physical embodiment
  • Spatial navigation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

Cite this

Boari, D., & Fraser, M. (2009). Taking shortcuts: Embedded physical interfaces for spatial navigation. In Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction, TEI'09 (pp. 189-196). (Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction, TEI'09). https://doi.org/10.1145/1517664.1517706