Symbol communication in special schools in England: the current position and some key issues

Chris Abbott, Helen Lucey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In this article, originally submitted to B J S E's Research Section, Chris Abbott of King's College, London, and Helen Lucey of the Open University report on the outcomes of a survey of special schools in England. The aim of the research, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, was to understand the nature and extent of symbol use for communication and literacy. A questionnaire was used to collect data on topics including: the types of symbols in use; the methodologies operated; ownership of symbol choice; and agreed policies within and outside school. The researchers had an excellent response in this important survey, undertake n after a period of rapid growth in symbol use in special schools and elsewhere. Chris Abbott and Helen Lucey provide a discussion of the results of their survey and of the issues that arise from the findings and the many comments added by respondents. They close their article with a call for further detailed research, both in the UK and in co-operation with practitioners in other countries, into the ways in which symbol use can meet the needs of learners.
LanguageEnglish
Pages196-201
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Special Education
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatusPublished - 2005

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England
symbol
Communication
communication
school
Research
Ownership
literacy
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Surveys and Questionnaires
questionnaire
methodology
Growth

Cite this

Symbol communication in special schools in England: the current position and some key issues. / Abbott, Chris; Lucey, Helen.

In: British Journal of Special Education, Vol. 32, No. 4, 2005, p. 196-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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