Supply chain management research impact: An evidence-based perspective

C M Harland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - Using an evidence-based management theoretical lens, research impact is examined to provide guidance to supply chain management academics in evidencing and exploiting the outputs, outcomes and impact of their research.

Design/methodology/approach - Evidence-based management theory is examined and applied to types of academic research impact. The distinction between academic and non-academic impact is developed into a supply chain framework of research outputs, transfer, outcomes, impact and national/ international benefits. Impact of supply chain management research is explored through a case study in the English National Health Service. Future opportunities and challenges for supply chain management researchers arising from increasing demand for and supply of evidence are discussed.

Findings - Author academic impact and citations are found to be increasingly important building blocks of evidence-based evaluations of individual academics, journals, research quality assessments of groups and universities, and global rankings of universities. Supply chain management researchers can compare their impact with other areas of academia. Non-academic impact of research has been assessed by funders of research projects and has spread to research quality assessments of universities.

Practical implications - Bibliometrics provide evidence of author and journal impact that can be used in human resource decisions, research quality assessments and global rankings of universities; this availability enables a debate on appropriate use of academic impact evidence. Supply chain management academics evidencing non-academic research impact on business, society and economy will enable governments and funders of research to evaluated value for money return on their investment.

Originality/value - This perspective of evidence-based evaluation of research impact and its implications might encourage debate on academic and non-academic impact and encourage supply chain researchers to consider evidencing impact in their research design and methodology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)483-496
Number of pages14
JournalSupply Chain Management: An International Journal
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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