Stop Smoking Practitioners’ understanding of e-cigarettes’ use and efficacy with particular reference to vapers’ socioeconomic status

Rosemary Hiscock, Deborah Arnott, Martin Dockrell, Louise Ross, Andy McEwen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
23 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction: We have undertaken four online surveys of Stop Smoking Service (SSS) practitioners in England, between 2011 and 2016, in order to enhance our understanding of e-cigarettes: a fast moving new phenomenon. It is important to understand whether e-cigarettes can ameliorate or exacerbate health inequalities given that smoking is one of the most serious causes of excessive mortality and morbidity among disadvantaged groups globally. Aims: To update findings of previous surveys and examine socioeconomic status differences in e-cigarette use and efficacy. Methods: Analysis was undertaken of electronic surveys, particularly, the most recent 2016 survey (n = 514) and 2015/16 SSS client routine monitoring data. Results: SSS practitioners were becoming more positive about e-cigarettes: 42% agreed that e-cigarettes were a good thing compared with 15% in 2011. Reported use of e-cigarettes among SSS clients was low (about 3%) despite higher quit rates (63% of clients reported being quit at four week follow-up, compared with 51% overall). Where socioeconomic differences in e-cigarettes’ efficacy for quitting were identified, affluent and working smokers were advantaged. Conclusions: Low use of e-cigarettes by clients and practitioner opinions suggest that further education of SSS staff is needed if they are to adopt the current service recommendations about e-cigarettes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-31
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Smoking Cessation
Volume14
Issue number1
Early online date20 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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