Staff experiences of using non-violent resistance in a residential care home for young people with high-risk behaviours

Jessica Mackinnon, Peter Jakob, Claudia Kustner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Non-violent resistance (NVR) is a systemic approach to working with young people presenting with aggression and other harmful behaviours. The work draws on the use of personal presence in resistance movements of the twentieth century, focusing on the role of the caregiver to increase their presence through acts of resistance and care. This paper investigates the experiences of professionals using NVR in one UK residential care home. Eight participants took part in semi-structured interviews, which were analysed thematically. Analysis identified four overarching themes: NVR is both a set of processes and a way of being, NVR and transformation, NVR and the personal–professional divide and NVR and organisational support. The findings suggest that NVR offers an effective and acceptable alternative to behavioural approaches. Further research is required to investigate the liminal role of the professional/parent and the challenge of managing reluctance both within and around the organisation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Family Therapy
Early online date1 Dec 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Dec 2022

Keywords

  • child and adolescent mental health
  • high-risk behaviours
  • looked-after children
  • non-violent resistance
  • residential care
  • systemic therapy
  • violence and aggression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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