Staff attitude towards cocaine/crack-cocaine use amongst individuals with severe mental health problems in an inner city area of the UK

Ruth Clutterbuck, Derek Tobin, Jim Orford, Alex Copello, Max Birchwood, Ed Day, Hermine Graham, Dermot McGovern, Emma Griffith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cocaine/crack-cocaine use is associated with a number of negative outcomes in people with mental health problems.

Aims: To explore the extent of use in individuals with severe mental health problems and impact of client use on mental health service staff.

Method: Following Graham et al. (2001), care coordinators within community mental health teams in Birmingham, UK completed a prevalence survey of cocaine/crack-cocaine use in clients on their current caseload to determine the extent of use. Findings were compared to those of Graham et al. Interviews with staff explored the impact of cocaine/crack-cocaine on client outcome and effects on staff within the teams under study.

Results: An increase in cocaine/crack-cocaine use is reported (from 5.6% to 11.5% over 8 years). Interview data indicate that despite this increase, staff declare themselves more competent and confident in dealing with cocaine/crack-cocaine use.

Conclusions: We propose that the integration of substance use treatment within mainstream mental health services is, in part, responsible for this finding.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-215
JournalMental Health and Substance Use
Volume1
Issue number3
Early online date18 Sep 2008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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