Social support in coping with alcohol and drug problems at home: Findings from Mexican and English families

J Orford, G Natera, J Davies, A Nava, J Mora, K Rigby, C Bradbury, A Copello, Richard Velleman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The presence or absence of support from other people was one of the topics included in semi-structured interviews carried out with close relatives of people with alcohol or ether drug problems in Mexico and England. Of the full set of interviews, matched sub-samples of twelve reports from each country were analysed qualitatively. Examples of the support received, or lacked, by two relatives are first presented in some detail. The main sub-categories of support, or its lack, described in the twenty-four reports are then presented. Finally a preliminary comparison of data from the two countries is also reported. As well as providing a derailed picture of types of support (e.g, emotional, material) that are familiar from studies with other populations, this paper also emphasizes the importance of the close relative's perception of the relationship between the alcohol or drug user and the supportive or unsupportive 'other: and describes a range of circumstances under which relatives are denied support. Preliminary support is obtained for the hypothesis that Mexican social networks would be more dominated by kin and neighbours, whilst English relatives would draw for support upon more diverse networks.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-420
Number of pages26
JournalAddiction Research
Volume6
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Social support in coping with alcohol and drug problems at home: Findings from Mexican and English families'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Orford, J., Natera, G., Davies, J., Nava, A., Mora, J., Rigby, K., Bradbury, C., Copello, A., & Velleman, R. (1998). Social support in coping with alcohol and drug problems at home: Findings from Mexican and English families. Addiction Research, 6(5), 395-420.