Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing

James Mckinley

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

This paper makes the argument that we need to situate student’s academic writing as socially constructed pieces of writing that embody a writer’s cultural identity and critical argument. In support, I present and describe a comprehensive model of an original EFL writing analytical framework. This article explains the interrelationship between the elements of cultural practices in academic discourse, writer identity, and critical thinking, and argues how this is influenced by the sociocultural values of academic discourse. This interrelationship is realized by viewing EFL writing through a social constructivist lens, showing how critical thinking processes are shaped by awareness of the sociocultural conventions of academic discourse, and how critical thinking arises from a writer identity aligned with the culture of English academic writing.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - Aug 2014
EventAssociation Internationale de Linguistique Appliquée World Congress - Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 10 Aug 201415 Aug 2014
Conference number: 17
http://www.aila.info/en/15-front-news/121-aila-world-congress-2014.html

Conference

ConferenceAssociation Internationale de Linguistique Appliquée World Congress
Abbreviated titleAILA World Congress
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period10/08/1415/08/14
Internet address

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