Sleep patterns and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among children from around the world

Jean-Philippe Chaput, Mark S Tremblay, Peter T Katzmarzyk, Mikael Fogelholm, Gang Hua, Carol Maher, José Maia, Timothy Olds, Vincent O. Onywera, Olga L Sarmiento, Martyn Standage, Catrine Tudor-Locke, H Sampasa-Kanyinga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective
To examine the relationships between objectively measured sleep patterns (sleep duration, sleep efficiency and bedtime) and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption (regular soft drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks and fruit juice) among children from all inhabited continents of the world.
Design
Multinational, cross-sectional study.
Setting
The International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE).
Subjects
Children (n 5873) 9–11 years of age.
Results
Sleep duration was 12 min per night shorter in children who reported consuming regular soft drinks ‘at least once a day’ compared with those who reported consuming ‘never’ or ‘less than once a week’. Children were more likely to sleep the recommended 9–11 h/night if they reported lower regular soft drink consumption or higher sports drinks consumption. Children who reported consuming energy drinks ‘once a week or more’ reported a 25-min earlier bedtime than those who reported never consuming energy drinks. Children who reported consuming sports drinks ‘2–4 d a week or more’ also reported a 25-min earlier bedtime compared with those who reported never consuming sports drinks. The associations between sleep efficiency and SSB consumption were not significant. Similar associations between sleep patterns and SSB consumption were observed across all twelve study sites.
Conclusions
Shorter sleep duration was associated with higher intake of regular soft drinks, while earlier bedtimes were associated with lower intake of regular soft drinks and higher intake of energy drinks and sports drinks in this international study of children. Future work is needed to establish causality and to investigate underlying mechanisms.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2385-2393
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume21
Issue number13
Early online date23 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

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Beverages
Sleep
Carbonated Beverages
Energy Drinks
Sports
Pediatric Obesity
Causality
Life Style
Cross-Sectional Studies

Cite this

Chaput, J-P., Tremblay, M. S., Katzmarzyk, P. T., Fogelholm, M., Hua, G., Maher, C., ... Sampasa-Kanyinga, H. (2018). Sleep patterns and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among children from around the world. Public Health Nutrition, 21(13), 2385-2393. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980018000976

Sleep patterns and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among children from around the world. / Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Tremblay, Mark S; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Fogelholm, Mikael; Hua, Gang; Maher, Carol; Maia, José; Olds, Timothy; Onywera, Vincent O.; Sarmiento, Olga L; Standage, Martyn; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Sampasa-Kanyinga, H.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 21, No. 13, 01.09.2018, p. 2385-2393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chaput, J-P, Tremblay, MS, Katzmarzyk, PT, Fogelholm, M, Hua, G, Maher, C, Maia, J, Olds, T, Onywera, VO, Sarmiento, OL, Standage, M, Tudor-Locke, C & Sampasa-Kanyinga, H 2018, 'Sleep patterns and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among children from around the world', Public Health Nutrition, vol. 21, no. 13, pp. 2385-2393. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980018000976
Chaput J-P, Tremblay MS, Katzmarzyk PT, Fogelholm M, Hua G, Maher C et al. Sleep patterns and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among children from around the world. Public Health Nutrition. 2018 Sep 1;21(13):2385-2393. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980018000976
Chaput, Jean-Philippe ; Tremblay, Mark S ; Katzmarzyk, Peter T ; Fogelholm, Mikael ; Hua, Gang ; Maher, Carol ; Maia, José ; Olds, Timothy ; Onywera, Vincent O. ; Sarmiento, Olga L ; Standage, Martyn ; Tudor-Locke, Catrine ; Sampasa-Kanyinga, H. / Sleep patterns and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among children from around the world. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2018 ; Vol. 21, No. 13. pp. 2385-2393.
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AU - Maher, Carol

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