Should persuasion be affective or cognitive? The moderating effects of need for affect and need for cognition

Geoffrey Haddock, Gregory R. Maio, Karin Arnold, Thomas Huskinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three experiments tested the hypothesis that need for affect and need for cognition influence receptivity to affect- and cognition-based persuasive messages. Experiment 1 found that an affective message elicited more positive attitudes among individuals high in need for affect and low in need for cognition, whereas a cognitive message elicited more positive attitudes among individuals low in need for affect and high in need for cognition. Experiment 2 found that individual differences in need for affect influenced receptivity to an affect-based (but not cognition-based) message, whereas individual differences in need for cognition influenced receptivity to a cognition-based (but not affect-based) message. Experiment 3 found that individual differences in need for affect were associated with increased recognition of information from an affect-based (but not cognition-based) message, whereas individual differences in need for cognition were associated with increased recognition of information from a cognition-based (but not affect-based) message. Overall, the studies point to the importance of individual differences in need for affect and need for cognition in understanding how individuals respond to different types of persuasive messages.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)769-778
Number of pages10
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008

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