Should I stay or should I go? Mood congruity, self-monitoring and retail context preference

Nancy M. Puccinelli, Rohit Deshpande, Alice M. Isen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article extends the discussion of congruity or the preference by consumers for alternatives similar to themselves 1) by examining the effect in a retail context and, 2) by considering the moderating role of self-monitoring, or the tendency to regulate one's mood in line with the social context, on congruity. Two experiments find that when low self-monitors imagine a context that differs in valence from their mood, they feel more distinctive from the environment while high self-monitors do not. The feelings of low self-monitors, in turn, seem to lead them to prefer contexts that are congruent in valence with their mood. High self-monitors on the other hand prefer a context that differs in valence from their mood. It is argued that high self-monitors seek a mood-incongruent context to achieve normative regulation of their mood. The implications of these results for retail atmospherics are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)640-648
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Business Research
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

Keywords

  • Congruence
  • Mood
  • Retail
  • Self-monitoring
  • Services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing
  • Applied Psychology

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