Service use in adolescents at risk of depression and self-harm

prospective longitudinal study

Kapil Sayal, Nichola Yates, Melissa Spears, Paul Stallard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Although depression and self-harm are common mental health problems in adolescents, there are barriers to accessing help. Using a community-based sample, this study investigates predictors of service contacts for adolescents at high risk of depression and self-harm. Methods: Three thousand seven hundred and forty-nine (3,749) 12- to 16-year-olds in UK secondary (high) schools provided baseline and 6 months' follow-up data on mood, self-harm and service contacts with a range of primary and secondary healthcare services. Results: Although most adolescents at high risk of depression or self-harm had seen their general practitioner (GP) in the previous 6 months, less than one-third had used primary or secondary healthcare services for emotional problems. 5 % of adolescents who reported self-harm had seen specialist child and adolescent mental health services in the previous 6 months. In longitudinal analyses, after adjustment for confounders, both depression and self-harm predicted the use of any healthcare services [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.34 (95 % CI 1.09, 1.64); AOR = 1.38 (95 % CI 1.02, 1.86), respectively] and of specialist mental health services [AOR = 5.48 (95 % CI 2.27, 13.25); AOR = 2.58 (95 % CI 1.11, 6.00), respectively]. Amongst those with probable depression, 79 % had seen their GP and 5 % specialist mental health services in the preceding year. Conclusions: Most adolescents at high risk of depression or self-harm see their GP over a 6-month period although only a minority of them access specialist mental health services. Their consultations within primary care settings provide a potential opportunity for their identification and for signposting to appropriate specialist services.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1231-1240
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume49
Issue number8
Early online date4 Feb 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

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Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
Mental Health Services
Prospective Studies
Depression
adolescent
mental health
health service
general practitioner
Odds Ratio
General Practitioners
Primary Health Care
Adolescent Health Services
contact
Delivery of Health Care
mood
Mental Health
Referral and Consultation
minority
school

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Service use in adolescents at risk of depression and self-harm : prospective longitudinal study. / Sayal, Kapil; Yates, Nichola; Spears, Melissa; Stallard, Paul.

In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Vol. 49, No. 8, 08.2014, p. 1231-1240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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